Have You Heard Of Clonezilla?

It’s a cute name. However, Clonezilla is more than just a cute name. If you haven’t heard of it, here’s what Clonezilla is all about.

Clonezilla is a free and open source disk partition and image cloning program. You can use Clonezilla for system backups, full drive clones, system deployments, and more. Furthermore, it supports an enormous range of file systems, as well as multiple boot loaders, encryption, and more.

(Via: https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-use-clonezilla/)

So, if you’ve just bought a new computer and you’re thinking of moving your old files to it, Clonezilla is a good option.

When you buy a new computer, you have to move your old files to your new system. Copying folder after folder, file after file is tedious. Thankfully, you can use Clonezilla to clone your entire drive to a new drive. Drive cloning with Clonezilla is fast, simple, and best of all, completely free.

(Via: https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-use-clonezilla/)

Now, before you start cloning your Windows 10 drive, you have to check the capacity of your second drive.

Please note that to clone your Windows 10 drive, your second drive must have an equal or larger capacity to your current storage. For instance, if you want to clone a drive that is using 60 GB storage, the recipient drive must also have at least 60 GB available for a complete clone.

(Via: https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-use-clonezilla/)

The first thing you need to do is to download Clonezilla. Here’s how you can do it.

You will need a USB flash drive to download Clonezilla. You can make the download quicker with a USB 3 16 gigabyte but you really use any USB for it. Now, go to Tuxboot.org. Then click on the download link on the side.

Once that’s done, go to your download folder to run the executable file. Click on the default option, which is the Clonezilla live version. To avoid overwriting an SD or another thumb drive, make sure to select the USB drive that you’ve inserted. Click “Okay” to download Clonezilla.

You can also create a …

How I Created a Code Beautifier in Two Days

I recently drew up a wireframe for a code beautifier. The next day, I decided to turn it into a real tool. The whole project took less than two days to complete.

I’d been thinking about building a new code beautifier for a while. The idea isn’t unique, but every time I use someone else’s tool, I find myself reapplying the same settings and dodging advertisements every single time. 🤦🏻‍

I wanted a simple tool that worked well without the hassle, so last week I grabbed some paper and started sketching one out. I’m a huge fan of wireframing by hand. There’s just something about pencil and paper that makes the design part of my brain work better than staring at a screen.

I kicked off the design process by hand-drawing wireframes for the app.

I was immediately inspired after drawing the wireframe. The next day, I took a break from my usual routine to turn it into a something real. 👨🏻‍💻

Check it Out

The design

I knew I wanted the code editor to be the main focus of the tool, so I created a thin menu bar at the top that controls the mode (i.e. HTML, CSS, JavaScript) and settings. I eventually added an About button too.

The editor itself takes up most of the screen, but it blends in so you don’t really notice it. Instead of wasting space with instructions, I used a placeholder that disappears when you start typing.

The Dark Mode UI is based on a toggle that updates the styles.

At the bottom, I created a status bar that shows live stats about the code including the current mode, indentation settings, number of lines, number of characters, and document size in bytes. The right side of the status bar has a “Clear” and “Clean + Copy” button. The center has a logo shamelessly plugging my own service.

I don’t think many developers really code on phones, but I wanted this to work on mobile devices anyway. Aside from the usual responsive techniques, I …

What the Web Needs Now (and how ARTIFACT is here for it)

I recently had the pleasure of joining Dave Rupert, Chris Coyier, and Chris Ferdinandi on the Shop Talk Show to talk about the upcoming ARTIFACT Conference (Austin, TX on Sept. 30 – Oct. 1, 2019). ARTIFACT is an intimate gathering of web designers and developers where we discuss ways to build web sites that work for everyone.

This isn’t our first rodeo! I started ARTIFACT back in 2013 with Christopher Schmitt and Ari Stiles (the team behind the legendary In Control and CSS Dev conferences). At that time, the sudden avalanche of web-enabled mobile devices was throwing the web design community for a loop. How do we best leverage the recently-introduced Responsive Design techniques to adapt our designs to a spectrum of screen sizes?! What does that do to our workflows?! What happens to our beloved Photoshop comps?! How do we educate our clients and structure our billing cycles?! It was an exciting time when we needed to adjust our processes quickly to take on a radically new web viewing environment.

After four events in 2013 and 2014, ARTIFACT took a little hiatus, but we are back for a five-year reunion in 2019. We are returning to a landscape where a lot of the challenges we faced in 2013 have been figured out or, at the very least, have settled down (although there is always room for innovation and improvement).

Is our work making the web better done? Not by a long shot! Now that we’ve got a handle on the low-bar requirement of getting something readable on all those screens, we can focus our energy on higher-order challenges. How do we make our sites work easier for people of all abilities? How do we make our content, products, and services welcoming to everyone? Does our code need to be so bloated and complicated? How can we make our sites simpler and faster? How can I put new tools like CSS Grid, Progressive Web Apps, static sites, and animation to good use?

To that end, this time around ARTIFACT is …

25+ Best Newborn Lightroom Presets for Baby Photography

Every parent wants to take beautiful photos of their newborn baby to create precious memories. Wouldn’t it be great if you could make those photos look professional with just one-click? That’s exactly what you can do with these newborn and baby Lightroom presets

Photos you take with your digital camera or your iPhone don’t always look all that professional. But there’s no need to hire a professional photographer to capture beautiful photos of your newborn baby. Using this collection of Lightroom presets, you can instantly make your photos look more adorable than ever with a few simple clicks.

In this collection, we’re sharing a set of Lightroom presets specially designed for improving baby photos. With the help of these presets, you’ll be able to capture every adorable moment of your newborn just like a professional photographer.

5 Tips for Editing Baby Photography

Just like taking care of babies, when editing newborn photography you have to treat them with extra care. Follow these tips to get the best results from your baby photography.

1. Use Retouching if Necessary

Newborn photography often amplifies and highlight some unnecessary parts of newborn babies. As a result, the dry skin and red splotches are some of the most common things you have to deal with when processing baby photos.

Sometimes, in order to create a timeless look, you’d want to retouch the baby skin in photos to minimize these areas and create memories that last for a long time.

2. Improving Lighting and Reduce Contrast

Newborn photos look better when taken with natural light. However, it’s also something you can’t control to your preference. For those photos taken in different lighting conditions, you can use Lightroom to optimize the photos with various adjustments.

Also, consider adjusting contrast and slightly lowering it to reduce highlights and give more attention to the baby. However, it also depends on the conditions of the photo shoot.

3. Add Soft and Light Filters

It’s hard to resist adding a filter to your baby photos when there are so many choices …

30+ Best Gothic Fonts

There’s something unusually attractive about a gothic font design. It can make any typographical layout look magnificent and majestic, and it’s probably why gothic fonts are widely used in branding and logo design.

If you’ve been looking for a unique gothic font for a new project, you’re in luck. We’ve handpicked the best gothic fonts for this collection, with various design styles that you can use to design logos, book covers, posters, website headers, t-shirt designs, and much more. Explore the collection and start downloading!

What Are Gothic Fonts?

Gothic is a style of design that dates back to many years. This design style is inspired by the culture and the architecture from the Middle Ages.

Gothic fonts (also referred to as Blackletter fonts) are a type of fonts that feature the same style of gothic designs in its characters. Gothic fonts are easily recognizable thanks to their unique style of design.

Gothic fonts are now being used in many types of modern designs ranging from product labels to tattoos, badges, logos, poster titles, and much more.

Top Pick

Osgard Pro – Elegant Gothic Font

Osgard Pro - Elegant Gothic Font

Osgard Pro features a modern luxury gothic design that mixes both Gothic and Blackletter design styles together.

This font is perfect for logotypes and branding works related to luxury brands, businesses, high-end products, and fashion brands. It also includes 1000 swashes and ligatures as well.

Why This Is A Top Pick

Osgard comes with a design inspired by the typography from the ancient Rome and includes influences from The Ribble Valley where writer J.R.R.Tolkien worked on his books. It’s one of the best-looking gothic fonts on our list.

Medusa Gothic Font

Medusa Gothic Font

Medusa is one of the most beautiful gothic fonts we’ve seen that represents the core features of a true gothic font. Featuring unique ornaments and serifs, the font keeps its elegance throughout its design. This makes it the perfect choice for professional logos, book covers, titles, and much more.

Darklands – A Modern Blackletter Font

Darklands - A Modern Blackletter Font

Darklands is a beautiful gothic blackletter font that features …

GameMode – A Tool To Improve Gaming Performance On Linux

Ask some Linux users why they still sticks with Windows dual boot, probably the answer would be – “Games!”. It was true! Luckily, open source gaming platforms like Steam and Lutris have brought many games...

The post GameMode – A Tool To Improve Gaming Performance On Linux appeared first on OSTechNix.

from OSTechNix https://www.ostechnix.com/gamemode-a-tool-to-improve-gaming-performance-on-linux/…

10 Best Mobile Apps for Learning to Code

What’s even better is that you don’t have to spend years mastering programming either. Thanks to numerous coding apps available for both Android and iOS devices, you can easily level up your coding skills even when you’re on the go.

In this post, we’ve rounded up the best coding apps that will help you learn to code like a pro.

SoloLearn

SoloLearn is an app available for both iOS and Android devices and it also has a web app so you can use it to learn to code from anywhere. The app offers a number of different courses in languages such as JavaScript, Python, Java, and more. The app offers free trial as well as paid monthly and yearly plans.

Encode

Encode is an Android app that offers lessons in programming in bite-sized portions. The app has programming challenges that you have to solve in order to progress further. It also includes practical examples and teaches you how to program in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Python. On top of that, the app has offline mode so you can continue learning even if you aren’t connected to the Internet.

Codemurai

Codemurai offers hundreds of bite-sized coding lessons that were created by industry experts on web development, mobile app, and game development. The app has lessons for languages that include HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Python, TypeScript, Angular 2, MongoDB, Node, React, and more. You will learn programming through fun coding challenges and then have the ability to test your knowledge with quizzes.

Mimo

Mimo is a programming app that allows you to develop programming skills that will help you develop an app or a game, make a website or become a hacker. Based on your preferences and interests, you will get a personalized track that will teach you the necessary skills. It’s available for both iOS and Android devices and offers courses in JavaScript, Ruby, Swift, C, C++, and other popular languages.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper is a free iOS and Android app that teaches you how to code through JavaScript puzzles that you have …

Weekly Platform News: CSS ::marker pseudo-element, pre-rendering web components, adding Webmention to your site

Šime posts regular content for web developers on webplatform.news.

In this week’s roundup: datepickers are giving keyboard users headaches, a new web component compiler that helps fight FOUC, we finally get our hands on styling list item markers, and four steps to getting webmentions on your site.

Using plain text fields for date input

Keyboard users prefer regular text fields over complex date pickers, and voice users are frustrated by the native control (<input type="date">).

Previously, I have relied on plain text inputs as date fields with custom validation for the site, typically using the same logic on the client and the server. For known dates — birthdays, holidays, anniversaries, etc. — it has tested well.

(via Adrian Roselli)

Pre-rendering web components

Stencil is a “web component compiler” that can be used to pre-render web components (including Shadow DOM) or hide them until they are fully styled to avoid the flash of unstyled content (FOUC).

This tool also makes sure that polyfills are only loaded when needed, and its Component API includes useful decorators and hooks that make writing web components easier (e.g., the Prop decorator handles changes to attributes).

import { Component, Prop, h } from "@stencil/core";

@Component({
  tag: "my-component"
})
export class MyComponent {
  @Prop() age: number = 0;

  render() {
    return <div>I am {this.age} years old</div>;
  }
}

(via Max Lynch)

The CSS ::marker pseudo-element

When the CSS display: list-item declaration is applied to an element, the element generates a marker box containing a marker, e.g., a list bullet (the <li> and <summary> elements have markers by default).

Markers can be styled via the ::marker pseudo-element (useful for changing the color or font of the marker), but this CSS feature is currently only supported in Firefox.

(via Rachel Andrew)

Adding Webmention to your website

  1. Sign up on Webmention.io; this is a service that collects webmentions on your behalf.
  2. Add <link rel="webmention"> (with the appropriate href value) to your web pages.

    There are also Webmention plugins available for

Using GraphQL Playground with Gatsby

I’m assuming most of you have already heard about Gatsby, and at least loosely know that it’s basically a static site generator for React sites. It generally runs like this:

  1. Data Sources → Pull data from anywhere.
  2. Build → Generate your website with React and GraphQL.
  3. Deploy → Send the site to any static site host.

What this typically means is that you can get your data from any recognizable data source — CMS, markdown, file systems and databases, to name a few — manage the data through GraphQL to build your website, and finally deploy your website to any static web host (such as Netlify or Zeit).

Screenshot of the Gatsby homepage. It shows the three different steps of the Gatsby build process showing how data sources get built and then deployed.
The Gatsby homepage illustration of the Gatsby workflow.

In this article, we are concerned with the build process, which is powered by GraphQL. This is the part where your data is managed. Unlike traditional REST APIs where you often need to send anonymous data to test your endpoints, GraphQL consolidates your APIs into a self-documenting IDE. Using this IDE, you can perform GraphQL operations such as queries, mutations, and subscriptions, as well as view your GraphQL schema, and documentation.

GraphQL has an IDE built right into it, but what if we want something a little more powerful? That’s where GraphQL Playground comes in and we’re going to walk through the steps to switch from the default over to GraphQL Playground so that it works with Gatsby.

GraphiQL and GraphQL Playground

GraphiQL is GraphQL’s default IDE for exploring GraphQL operations, but you could switch to something else, like GraphQL Playground. Both have their advantages. For example, GraphQL Playground is essentially a wrapper over GraphiQL but includes additional features such as:

  • Interactive, multi-column schema documentation
  • Automatic schema reloading
  • Support for GraphQL Subscriptions
  • Query history
  • Configuration of HTTP headers
  • Tabs
  • Extensibility (themes, etc.)

Choosing either GraphQL Playground or GraphiQL most likely depends on whether you need to use those additional features. There’s no strict rule that will make you write better GraphQL operations, or build a better …

Get Peak WordPress Performance with Jetpack

The irony of web performance is that the average page weight of a site continues to go up year after year, despite us being more aware of the problem and having more tools at our disposal to fight it than ever.

To paraphrase Seinfeld, “we know how to fight page weight issues; we just don’t use the tools we have to fight page weight issues.”

That’s why Jetpack provides powerful features for all users at any plan level. They made it so that performance is integrated right into managing content on a WordPress site.

One of those things is lazy loading images. Lazy loading is an excellent technique to defer loading images until they are actually needed. So, an image never loads until the user actually scrolls to where it comes into display. That could potentially save a ton of server requests and precious bytes when waiting for a page to load. Jetpack includes lazy loading, even on free plans, so everyone has access to this performance boost.


And what’s the point of lazy loading anything if you don’t have somewhere to host the files? Well, Jetpack also offers unlimited static file and image hosting for every plan level. No more wondering how much storage is left on your server! You get an unlimited amount of space to store anything you need. That’s pretty awesome!

It gets even more awesome. That’s because the unlimited storage is part of a CDN that is designed to serve images from high-speed dedicated data centers that make downloads as fast and smooth as possible. Again, that’s free to everyone!

That makes Jetpack a super resource for combatting performance issues on a WordPress site. Hey, we use Jetpack here at CSS-Tricks and it’s a linchpin for so much of how this site works and operates. The performance benefits are a nice perk but it’s worth checking out everything it has to offer because there’s likely so much more you can leverage.

Get Jetpack

The post Get Peak WordPress Performance with Jetpack appeared …