20+ Best Company Profile Templates (Word + PowerPoint)

Creating a company profile brochure or slideshow is a big responsibility. You especially need to pay careful attention to the design, arranging content in a readable and attractive way. These company profile templates can be a huge time-saver!

Designed by professionals, these templates allow you to easily create a company profile brochure or a PowerPoint presentation without having to spend hours on perfecting the design.

We handpicked a collection of the best company profile templates for Word and PowerPoint, to help you create a modern company profile for your business. These templates are all easily customizable to boot.

What Is A Company Profile Template?

A company profile is mainly a document containing a detailed description of a company or a business made to educate customers, investors, and employees. It’s a multi-page document that includes all the details about the company, its mission, services, and more. Company profiles come in various sizes as well.

A company profile template is a template you can use to craft such documents with ease. These templates come fully formatted with paragraphs, columns, shapes, image placeholders, and more to let you easily design company profiles without having to spend hours perfecting the design.

The templates are also easily customizable. You’ll be able to edit pages, change colors, fonts, and replace images to create your own documents with just a few clicks.

Top Pick

Modern Company Profile Word Template

Modern Company Profile Word Template 2

This is the perfect template for crafting a modern and stylish company profile for any business ranging from corporate businesses to creative agencies and more.

The template comes with 28 unique page layouts, which you can easily customize to your preference. It’s available in both US Letter and A4 size as well.

Why This Is A Top Pick

This template comes with a clean and professional design and you can easily edit it using Microsoft Word. As an added bonus, it also includes an InDesign template for editing the template using the Adobe app.

ZENETA – Agency Company Profile Template

ZENETA - Agency Company Profile Template

This beautiful and modern company profile template is …

DuckDuckGo Bangs – Search Directly On Your Favorite Websites

Google Search needs no introduction! It is the top most used web search engine on the Internet. Besides Google, there are also other search engines, such as Bing, Baidu, DuckDuckGo, Yandex, Ask.com, AOL.com and many....

The post DuckDuckGo Bangs – Search Directly On Your Favorite Websites appeared first on OSTechNix.

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Things That Will Scare Your Web Design Clients

Dealing with concerned clients can be a challenge for numerous reasons. I liken it to running around with a fire extinguisher, desperately trying to put out blazes large and small. But it’s not just the panicky ones who need the occasional dousing. And it’s not necessarily their fault.

The web can be a scary place – even for seasoned designers. Trying to wrap our heads around privacy issues, security, accessibility and new technologies can make anyone’s head spin. So, just think of what they can do to the people who depend on us for help.

In some ways, it’s even worse for our clients. Why? Because there are any number of bad actors out there who are constantly trying to trick them, hack their site or otherwise extort a few extra dollars. Not to mention the perfectly legitimate things that, while innocent enough, can put a non-techie into a cold sweat.

With that in mind, here are a few items that tend to put even cool clients into panic mode. But don’t worry. Each one includes some tips for talking them off the emotional ledge.

Mysterious Spam Invoices

If you own a website, or even a domain, odds are you’re going to start receiving all manner of nuisance messages. Whether they appear in your inbox or your postal mail, their aim is to get you to spend money – often out of fear.

One of the more famous examples of this are phony domain registration renewals. A company (if you can call it that) will send a letter that looks like an invoice, claiming the client’s domain name is about to expire. It will probably mention all the terrible things that can happen if they don’t renew this instant. And, oh …

Third-Party Components at Their Best

I’m a fan of the componentization of the web. I think it’s a very nice way to build a website at just about any scale (except, perhaps, the absolute most basic). There are no shortage of opinions about what makes a good component, but say we scope that to third-party for a moment. That is, components that you just use, rather than components that you build yourself as part of your site’s unique setup.

What makes a third-party component good? My favorite attribute of a third-party component is when it takes something hard and makes it easy. Particularly things that recognize and properly handle nuances, or things that you might not even know enough about to get right.

Perhaps you use some component that does pop-up contextual menus for you. It might perform browser edge detection, such as ensuring the menu never appears cut off or off-screen. That’s a tricky little bit of programming that you might not get right if you did it yourself — or even forget to do.

I think of the <Link /> component that React Router has or what’s used on Gatsby sites. It automatically injects aria-current="page" for you on the links when you’re on that page. You can and probably should use that for a styling hook! And you probably would have forgotten to program that if you were handling your own links.

In that same vein, Reach UI Tabs have rigorous accessibility baked into them that you probably wouldn’t get right if you hand-rolled them. This React image component does all sorts of stuff that is relatively difficult to pull off with images, like the complex responsive images syntax, lazy loading, placeholders, etc. This is, in a sense, handing you best practices for “free.”

Here’s a table library that doesn’t even touch UI for you, and instead focuses on other needs you’re likely to have with tables, which is another fascinating approach.

Anyway! Here’s what y’all said when I was asking about this. What makes a third-party component awesome? What do

NetNewsWire and Feedbin

NetNewsWire is one of the classic RSS apps, debuting in 2002. I was pretty stoked when it went 5.0 and was open-sourced in August 2019! You can snag it right here. (Sorry, Mac only.)

It’s super nice, is fast, and looks great. It has just the right features.

But… I thought, at least at first, that really prefer websites for reading RSS content. I have multiple machines. I have mobile devices. I don’t want my RSS to be limited to my laptop, I want an online service.

NetNewsWire on my Mac

Well! I found out that NetNewsWire syncs with my favorite website for RSS: Feedbin. The syncing works flawlessly. Both unread items and all the organization. In fact, the UI for organizing feeds is so nice in NetNewsWire that I managed everything there and was pleasantly surprised how it all synced perfectly with Feedbin.

Feedbin on the web

I know a lot of people miss Google Reader, but I think we’ve arrived at an even better place after all these years. The Google Reader UI for Google Reader was OK, but the main benefit was that it was the central place where everything synced together. That meant people could experiment by building readers and could use whatever they wanted. Feedbin clearly has APIs that can handle those types of things, so perhaps it could become that central hub service, which would be awesome.

I use Reeder on iOS, which also syncs with Feedbin. The central hub is real.

Reeder on iOS

I know a lot of people love Feedly too, which is also good. I just click with Feedbin better. I particularly like the Feedbin feature where it gives me an email address I can have newsletters sent to, letting me subscribe to a ton of them the same way I do with sites.

The …

Thinking Through Styling Options for Web Components

Where do you put styles in web components?

I’m assuming that we’re using the Shadow DOM here as, to me, that’s one of the big draws of a web component: a platform thing that is a uniquely powerful thing the platform can do. So this is about defining styles for a web component in a don’t-leak-out way, and less so a way to get global styles to leak in (although that’s very interesting as well, which can be done via custom properties which we’ll look at later in the article).

If you’re building the template inside the JavaScript — which is nice because of template literals and how we can sprinkle our data into the template nicely — you need access to those styles in JavaScript.

const template = `
  <style>${styles}</style>
  <div class="${class}">
    <h2>${title}</h2>
    ${content}
  </div>
`;

Where does that style variable come from? Maybe also a template literal?

const style = `
  :host {
    background: white;
  }
  h2 {
    font: 900 1.5rem/1.1 -system-ui, sans-serif;
  }
`;

I guess that’s fine, but it makes for a big messy block of code just dunked somewhere in the class where you’re trying to build this web component.

Another way is to <template> the template and make a <style> block part of it.

<template id="card-template">
  <style>
    :host {
      background: white;
    }
    h2 {
      font: 900 1.5rem/1.1 -system-ui, sans-serif;
    }
  </style>

  <div id="card-hook">
    <h2 id="title-hook"></h2>
    <p id="desc-hook"></p>
  </div>
</template>

I can see the appeal with this because it keeps HTML in HTML. What I don’t love about it is that you have to do a bunch of manual shadowRoot.querySelector("#title-hook").innerHTML = myData.title; work in order to flesh out that template. That doesn’t feel like a convenient template. I also don’t love that you need to just chuck this template somewhere in your HTML. Where? I dunno. Just chuck it in there. Chuck it.

The CSS is moved out of the JavaScript too, but it just moved from one awkward location to another.

If we wanted to keep the CSS in a CSS file, we can …

The Design Squiggle

I think we all have an intuitive understanding that, at the beginning of projects that require our creativity (be it design or code), things feel uncertain and messy. Then, as we go, things tend to straighten out. There is still some wiggling and setbacks, but by the end, we find a single solution and ship it.

Apparently this feeling has a logo: The Design Squiggle

The Process of Design Squiggle by Damien Newman, thedesignsquiggle.com

It comes from Damien Newman who says that a client gave him 30 seconds to sell them on the value of design, and this did the trick.

I find it a little funny to take this little concept and give it such a grandiose presentation. A dedicated website! A story with a boatload of name dropping! Very specific attribution instructions! But hey, I don’t have any famous doodles, and I gotta admit, this does a great job of expressing a complex thing quite quickly.

Reminds me of a boss a buddy of mine had who claims to have invented the Curiously Strong motto for Altoids, and didn’t mind telling people about it.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

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Can Best Practice Replace Design Research?

Heart-warming or not, co-creation with a client—the utopian ideal of shared vision—has its drawbacks. There are only so many times you can hear the words “brand strategy” before actually chewing your own face off. In the age of WordPress, Drupal and, dare I say it, Wix, it’s never been more tempting to pay lip-service to research and consultation. Instead of building a principles framework from scratch, why not roll out something from a template in a fraction of the time?

Well, in fact, there probably are situations where a simple WordPress-type approach will work really well. The trick is knowing when.

What Is “Best Practice” Anyway?

Well, exactly.

Even if you slept through design school, or didn’t go at all, you probably know the fundamentals already. And it’s true. If you stick to first principles, you won’t go far wrong. Here are some examples:

  • Color and Contrast: 2-3 colors maximum, use contrast to highlight important elements;
  • White Space: Use plenty of it, be consistent with proportions above and below;
  • Layout: Symmetric Grid. Err…Always. Work ‘above the fold’;
  • Typography: No more than 2-3 typefaces;
  • Logo: Long, top left, always;
  • Compexity vs Simplicity: Look for balance and visual interest;
  • Visual Hierarchy: Use color, contrast, size and complexity to highlight important elements;
  • Consistency: With all of the above, whatever you decide, be consistent;
  • And so on…

One size, though, doesn’t fit all. By bending and even breaking the rules sometimes, you’ll create designs that stand out and, more importantly, meet the real requirements of the brief.

The One Unbreakable Rule

It’s pretty hard to find a “Best Practice” that really works in every situation, but here’s one:

No matter what you’re doing, make sure you know why you’re doing it.

And, just in case you were wondering, “err…because it looks pretty?” and “because it’s easier than what I probably ought to do instead…” aren’t really reasons.

There are clearly situations where a client—whatever they may think—is best served by a simple off-the-shelf approach. Particularly if their budget is more Scrooge than …

Can Best Practice Replace Design Research?

Heart-warming or not, co-creation with a client—the utopian ideal of shared vision—has its drawbacks. There are only so many times you can hear the words “brand strategy” before actually chewing your own face off. In the age of WordPress, Drupal and, dare I say it, Wix, it’s never been more tempting to pay lip-service to research and consultation. Instead of building a principles framework from scratch, why not roll out something from a template in a fraction of the time?

Well, in fact, there probably are situations where a simple WordPress-type approach will work really well. The trick is knowing when.

What Is “Best Practice” Anyway?

Well, exactly.

Even if you slept through design school, or didn’t go at all, you probably know the fundamentals already. And it’s true. If you stick to first principles, you won’t go far wrong. Here are some examples:

  • Color and Contrast: 2-3 colors maximum, use contrast to highlight important elements;
  • White Space: Use plenty of it, be consistent with proportions above and below;
  • Layout: Symmetric Grid. Err…Always. Work ‘above the fold’;
  • Typography: No more than 2-3 typefaces;
  • Logo: Long, top left, always;
  • Compexity vs Simplicity: Look for balance and visual interest;
  • Visual Hierarchy: Use color, contrast, size and complexity to highlight important elements;
  • Consistency: With all of the above, whatever you decide, be consistent;
  • And so on…

One size, though, doesn’t fit all. By bending and even breaking the rules sometimes, you’ll create designs that stand out and, more importantly, meet the real requirements of the brief.

The One Unbreakable Rule

It’s pretty hard to find a “Best Practice” that really works in every situation, but here’s one:

No matter what you’re doing, make sure you know why you’re doing it.

And, just in case you were wondering, “err…because it looks pretty?” and “because it’s easier than what I probably ought to do instead…” aren’t really reasons.

There are clearly situations where a client—whatever they may think—is best served by a simple off-the-shelf approach. Particularly if their budget is more Scrooge than …

Can Best Practice Replace Design Research?

Heart-warming or not, co-creation with a client—the utopian ideal of shared vision—has its drawbacks. There are only so many times you can hear the words “brand strategy” before actually chewing your own face off. In the age of WordPress, Drupal and, dare I say it, Wix, it’s never been more tempting to pay lip-service to research and consultation. Instead of building a principles framework from scratch, why not roll out something from a template in a fraction of the time?

Well, in fact, there probably are situations where a simple WordPress-type approach will work really well. The trick is knowing when.

What Is “Best Practice” Anyway?

Well, exactly.

Even if you slept through design school, or didn’t go at all, you probably know the fundamentals already. And it’s true. If you stick to first principles, you won’t go far wrong. Here are some examples:

  • Color and Contrast: 2-3 colors maximum, use contrast to highlight important elements;
  • White Space: Use plenty of it, be consistent with proportions above and below;
  • Layout: Symmetric Grid. Err…Always. Work ‘above the fold’;
  • Typography: No more than 2-3 typefaces;
  • Logo: Long, top left, always;
  • Compexity vs Simplicity: Look for balance and visual interest;
  • Visual Hierarchy: Use color, contrast, size and complexity to highlight important elements;
  • Consistency: With all of the above, whatever you decide, be consistent;
  • And so on…

One size, though, doesn’t fit all. By bending and even breaking the rules sometimes, you’ll create designs that stand out and, more importantly, meet the real requirements of the brief.

The One Unbreakable Rule

It’s pretty hard to find a “Best Practice” that really works in every situation, but here’s one:

No matter what you’re doing, make sure you know why you’re doing it.

And, just in case you were wondering, “err…because it looks pretty?” and “because it’s easier than what I probably ought to do instead…” aren’t really reasons.

There are clearly situations where a client—whatever they may think—is best served by a simple off-the-shelf approach. Particularly if their budget is more Scrooge than …