20+ Best Free Photoshop Brushes

A graphic designer would never say no to free Photoshop brushes. We’ve found some creative and professional Photoshop brushes you can add to your collection, free of charge.

Having the right set of Photoshop brushes can be quite useful when working on many different types of design projects. Whether you’re painting an illustration or drawing a decorative artwork, nothing beats the Photoshop brush tool as it allows you to use your own styles in designs with the ability to add custom brushes.

This collection includes some of the best free Photoshop brushes you can use in all kinds of designs. Have fun adding them to your collection!

HD Watercolor Photoshop Brushes

HD Watercolor Photoshop Brushes

This is a collection of Photoshop brushes you must have if you’re a fan of watercolor designs and artworks. It includes 10 different high-resolution brushes that are compatible with Photoshop CS6 and higher. You can use them to make beautiful backgrounds, greeting card designs, posters, and much more.

TsaoShin Digital Art Photoshop Brushes

TsaoShin Digital Art Photoshop Brushes

A set of 4 creative Photoshop brushes made and used by a digital artist. These brushes will be quite useful to beginning illustrators and digital artists for drawing paintings as well as making creative graphic designs. The brushes work with Photoshop CS2 and higher.

Oil Painting Photoshop Brushes

Oil Painting Photoshop Brushes

This bundle of Photoshop brushes features a set of unique brushes inspired by oil paintings. If you’re looking to draw creative artworks and paintings with oil painting look and feel, this brush collection is a must-have.

Deharme’s ToolBox Photoshop Brush Set

Deharme's ToolBox Photoshop Brush Set

This is a collection of high-quality Photoshop brushes created by a professional artist. According to the creator, these brushes can be used as a starting point for digital painting for beginners. The brushes work well with Photoshop CC but they should work with lower versions as well.

Free Photoshop Ink Brushes

Free Photoshop Ink Brushes

With more than 190 different brushes to choose from, this bundle of Photoshop brushes will give you plenty of options for drawing illustrations, art, and many other types of design. These brushes feature all kinds of …

That Time I Tried Browsing the Web Without CSS

CSS is what gives every website its design. Websites sure aren’t very fun and friendly without it! I’ve read about somebody going a week without JavaScript and how the experience resulted in websites that were faster, though certain aspects of them would not function as expected.

But CSS. Turning off CSS while browsing the web wouldn’t exactly make the web far less usable… right? Or, like JavaScript, would some features not work as expected? Out of curiosity, I decided to give it a whirl and rip the CSS flesh off the HTML skeleton while browsing a few sites.

Why, you might ask? Are there any non-masochistic reasons for turning off CSS? Heydon Pickering once tweeted that disabling CSS is a good way to check some accessibility standards:

  1. Common elements like headings, lists, and form controls are semantic and still look good.
  2. A visual hierarchy is still established with default styles.
  3. The content can still be read in a logical order.
  4. Images still exist as <img> tags rather than getting lost as CSS backgrounds.

A WebAIM survey from 2018 reported that 12.5% of users who rely on any sort of assisted technology browse the web with custom stylesheets, which can include doing away with every CSS declaration across a site. And, if we’re talking about slow internet connections, ditching CSS could be one way to consume content faster. There’s also the chance that CSS is disabled for reasons outside our immediate control, like when a server has hiccups of fails to load assets.

As an experiment, I used five websites and a web app without CSS, and this post will cover my experiences. It wound up being a rather eye-opening adventure for me personally, but has also informed me professionally as a developer in ways I hope you’ll see as well.

But first, here’s how to disable CSS

You’re absolutely welcome to live vicariously through me in the form of this post. But for those of you who are feeling up to the task and want to experience a style-less web, …

Preload, prefetch and other link tags

Ivan Akulov has collected a whole bunch of information and know-how on making things load a bit more quickly with preload and prefetch. That’s great in and of itself, but he also points to something new to me – the as attribute:

<link rel="preload" href="/style.css" as="style" />

Supposedly, this helps browsers prioritize when to download assets and which assets to load.

My favorite part of this post is Ivan’s quick summary at the end which clearly defines what all these different tags can be used for:

<link rel="preload"> – when you’ll need a resource in a few seconds
<link rel="prefetch"> – when you’ll need a resource on a next page
<link rel="preconnect"> – when you know you’ll need a resource soon, but you don’t know its full url yet

Make sure to check out our own post on the matter of prefetching, preloading, and prebrowsing, too. Adding these things to our links can make significant performance improvements and so check it out to add more resources to your performance toolbox.

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from CSS-Tricks https://3perf.com/blog/link-rels/…

Ping Multiple Servers And Show The Output In Top-like Text UI

A while ago, we wrote about “Fping” utility which enables us to ping multiple hosts at once. Unlike the traditional “Ping” utility, Fping doesn’t wait for one host’s timeout. It uses round-robin method. Meaning –...

The post Ping Multiple Servers And Show The Output In Top-like Text UI appeared first on OSTechNix.

from OSTechNix https://www.ostechnix.com/ping-multiple-servers-and-show-the-output-in-top-like-text-ui/…

5 Steps for Successfully Offboarding Web Design Projects

As you draw closer to the finish line with a website, does your client see it just as clearly as you do? Or are they still wavering on design and copy choices even while you’re in the final stages of QA, or talking about additional features they’ll want to add to the site “some day”?

Unless you are getting paid — and paid well — for every single hour you put into a website, you have to be willing to enforce a final stopping point. If you don’t, your client will undoubtedly play the “What about this? Or this?” game for as long as you allow them to.

And you can’t afford to do that. You have other clients whose websites deserve your attention.

Just as you have created an onboarding process to smoothly kick off a new website project, you must do the same with an offboarding process.

Step 1: Collect Your Final Payment

Once the client has given you the approval on the finished website, you push it live. After some light testing to confirm that all is well on the live domain, it’s time to initiate the offboarding process.

You’ll do this by sending along the last invoice. Better yet, your invoicing software should automatically be configured to do this upon reaching the final project milestone.

My favorite tool to do this with is AND CO.

That’s because you can do everything in here:

  • Create a proposal;
  • Send the contract;
  • Track your time;
  • Send invoices.

Because each of these elements exist within the same place, setting up and scheduling invoices based on your project’s milestones (including the launch date) is really easy to do.

Don’t move on to the next steps until you collect the payment due though. Letting a client go any more than seven days after the project’s end without final payment simply invites them to ask you to do more work.

Step 2: Send the Wrap-up Email

Upon confirming receipt of payment, send your client a wrap-up email.

This doesn’t have to be …

20 Stylish PowerPoint Color Schemes

Color is an element that can make or break a design, and that rule holds true for presentation design as well. Choosing the right PowerPoint color scheme is super-important.

But there’s one extra thing to consider – where your presentation will be given. A PowerPoint presentation can look quite different on a computer or tablet versus on a projected screen.

When it comes to selecting a PowerPoint color scheme, this is an important consideration. Today we’ve rounded up 20 stylish PowerPoint color schemes as inspiration. While darker color schemes might look great close-up on screens, opt for lighter backgrounds (for enhanced readability) for projected presentations.

Note: The last color in each scheme is for the slide background.

1. Modern Blue

#1a4e66#e26c22#ffffff

powerpoint color schemes

When you aren’t planning to use brand colors – or maybe as a startup or independent contractor so you don’t have them yet – a modern color combination can add the right flair to a PowerPoint presentation.

The bright grayish blue in the Lekro PowerPoint template – you can find it here – adds the right amount of color without overwhelming the content. Plus, subtle orange accents help guide the eye throughout this PowerPoint color scheme. https://elements.envato.com/lekro-powerpoint-presentation-67YW3M

2. Blackish and Yellow

#3a3839#fed650#ffffff

powerpoint color schemes

While at first pass, black and yellow might seem like a harsh color combination, it can set the tone for a project that should emanate strength. This PowerPoint color scheme softens the harshness of the duo with a blackish color, that’s grayer and has a softer feel.

Pair this combo on a light background or with black and white images for a stylish, mod look.

3. Monotone Greens

#8cba60#59724b#fffff

powerpoint color schemes

Some of the best color schemes for presentations include a monotone palette. What’s nice about a single color style is that you know everything will always match!

This dark and light green pairing is simple, has a nice feel and even with a bright color creates a neutral feel.

4. Orange and White

# ff6908#ffffff

powerpoint color schemes

A bright color can soften the …

Who Are Design Systems For?

Specific design systems, I mean. Design systems, as a concept, are something just about any site can benefit from.

A lot of hype goes into design systems these days. Just the other day, an organization’s published their design system publicly and I got a slew of DMs, emails, and Slack messages encouraging me to check it out. “Looks good to me,” I said. But I’m merely knocking on the hood of a new car, so to speak. I haven’t sat in it. I haven’t driven it around the block, let alone driven it cross-country or tried to dig Cheerios out from between the seats. I’m sure I’d have more opinions after building a site or 10 with it (excuse the mixed metaphors).

So that leads me to a few questions. Can I build a site with this design system? Should I build a site with it? Is it for me? Or wait… who is this for?

They all have accordions.

Well not all of them, but bear with me, because there is a point to be made.

Bootstrap has an accordion too! Developers totally understand Bootstrap.

Whatever you think of it, I don’t see much confusion around Bootstrap. You link up the CSS, you use the HTML they give you and — 💥 — you have components that are ready to rock.

It’s possible that Bootstrap is a more of a “pattern library” than a “design system.” I dunno. There is probably something to that distinction, but the naming semantics (if there are any) seem to be used interchangeably, so distinguishing Bootstrap as one or the other doesn’t alleviate any confusion.

Developers reach for Bootstrap because…

  • It helps them build faster.
  • They get good quality “out of the box” if they aren’t particularly great at HTML and CSS themselves.
  • They want to be accessible and Bootstrap has been through the accessibility ringer.
  • [Insert your reason.]

Appealing, yet these seem to be somewhat table stakes for any design system and not exclusive to Bootstrap alone.

Hmmmm… Maybe I’ll have a

The Circle of a React Lifecycle

A React component goes through different phases as it lives in an application, though it might not be evident that anything is happening behind the scenes.

Those phases are:

  • mounting
  • updating
  • unmounting
  • error handling

There are methods in each of these phases that make it possible to perform specific actions on the component during that phase. For example, when fetching data from a network, you’d want to call the function that handles the API call in the componentDidMount() method, which is available during the mounting phase.

Knowing the different lifecycle methods is important in the development of React applications, because it allows us to trigger actions exactly when they’re needed without getting tangled up with others. We’re going to look at each lifecycle in this post, including the methods that are available to them and the types of scenarios we’d use them.

The Mounting Phase

Think of mounting as the initial phase of a component’s lifecycle. Before mounting occurs, a component has yet to exist — it’s merely a twinkle in the eyes of the DOM until mounting takes place and hooks the component up as part of the document.

There are plenty of methods we can leverage once a component is mounted: constructor() , render(), componentDidMount() and static getDerivedStateFromProps(). Each one is handy in it’s own right, so let’s look at them in that order.

constructor()

The constructor() method is expected when state is set directly on a component in order to bind methods together. Here is how it looks:

// Once the input component is mounting...
constructor(props) {
  // ...set some props on it...
  super(props);
  // ...which, in this case is a blank username...
  this.state = {
    username: ''
  };
  // ...and then bind with a method that handles a change to the input
  this.handleInputChange = this.handleInputChange.bind(this);
}

It is important to know that the constructor is the first method that gets called as the component is created. The component hasn’t rendered yet (that’s coming) but the DOM is aware of it and we can hook …

Netlify Functions for Sending Emails

Let’s say you’re rocking a JAMstack-style site (no server-side languages in use), but you want to do something rather dynamic like send an email. Not a problem! That’s the whole point of JAMstack. It’s not just static hosting. It’s that plus doing anything else you wanna do through JavaScript and APIs.

Here’s the setup: You need a service to help you send the email. Let’s just pick Sparkpost out of a hat. There are a number of them, and I’ll leave comparing their features and pricing to you, as we’re doing something extremely basic and low-volume here. To send an email with Sparkpost, you hit their API with your API key, provide information about the email you want to send, and Sparkpost sends it.

So, you’ll need to run a little server-side code to protect your API key during the API request. Where can you run that code? A Lambda is perfect for that (aka a serverless function or cloud function). There are lots of services to help you run these, but none are easier than Netlify, where you might be hosting your site anyway.

Get Sparkpost ready

I signed up for Sparkpost and made sure my account was all set up and verified. The dashboard there will give you an API key:

Toss that API Key into Netlify

Part of protecting our API key is making sure it’s only used in server-side code, but also that we keep it out of our Git repository. Netlify has environment variables that expose it to functions as needed, so we’ll plop it there:

Let’s spin up Netlify Dev, as that’ll make this easy to work with

Netlify Dev is a magical little tool that does stuff like run our static site generator for us. For the site I’m working on, I use Eleventy and Netlify Dev auto-detects and auto-runs it, which is super neat. But more importantly, for us, it gives us a local URL that runs our functions for testing.

Once it’s all installed, running …

25+ Best Double Exposure Photoshop Actions

The popular double exposure effect is not an easy effect to master. Only a Photoshop expert can pull it off. But, there’s a quick workaround you can use to achieve that same effect without any effort—with a double exposure Photoshop action.

Double exposure is a popular effect now being used in advertising, website designs, movie posters, and print media. Back in the day, photographers created this effect using their cameras by combining a silhouette photo and a fill photo. Designers took this effect to the next level using Photoshop. And the digital version of the effect gives you more control and freedom to achieve the perfect blend.

You don’t need expert skills to create this beautiful effect. Simply take a look through our collection of the best double exposure Photoshop actions and use it to instantly apply the effect to your photos.

AI Modern Double Exposure Actions

AI Modern Double Exposure Actions

Even though we’re not quite sure about the possibility of creating AI-powered Photoshop actions, the double exposure effect created by the actions in this bundle seems to be quite unique and accurate. It runs the Photoshop actions with organized layers for easily customizing the effect as well.

Color Double Exposure Photoshop Action

Color Double Exposure Photoshop Action

This unique Photoshop action allows you to create double exposure effects with a colorful design. The actions work with Photoshop CS4 and higher and it includes 50 different color presets for creating different styles of double exposure effects.

Animated Double Exposure Photoshop Action

Animated Double Exposure Photoshop Action

A modern Photoshop action featuring a stylish parallax double exposure effect. This action lets you create an animated double exposure effect that you can use to create GIFs and videos. It lets you choose from 4 different styles of the effect as well.

Modern Double Exposure Photoshop Action

Modern Double Exposure Photoshop Action

This is a creative double exposure Photoshop action you can use to create graphics with a more artistic approach. The action comes with 25 color scripts and uses adjustable layers for the effect to let you customize it however you like.

Creative Double Exposure Photoshop Action

Creative Double Exposure Photoshop Action

This simple double exposure …