8 Tips for Creating a Logo With Purpose

With so many logo design concepts, trends, and examples out there, how do you sort through all the clutter to create a logo that has a purpose for our brand or company?

It’s not always an easy task. The best and most memorable logos are not just designed well, they have purposeful meaning that creates a connection between the mark and organization it represents.

This can happen quickly with a brand that grows in popularity fast or steadily over time as a mark is established.

Here are some things to think about as you tackle creating (or recreating) a logo so that it has a purpose.

1. A Logo Should be Identifiable

logo design

When planning what your logo mark or brand, think about the user first. Approach it like you would a UX problem.

A logo design should be identifiable in a way that connects the symbol to the company or brand. You don’t need to see the word Nike to know the swoosh or Airbnb to understand the looping A. Think of the universal icon for recycling, above. You’d know that mark anywhere and know exactly what it means.

The key component of identification is with your target audience.

Think of a brand you interact with all the time. You can probably spot the logo quickly, knowing just what it means. But that might not be as universally true as a big brand. Regardless, it is equally effective. The logo is identifiable to the audience it serves.

2. It Should be Modern but Not Too Trendy

logo design

To connect with audiences, a logo design should have a modern look and feel, but shouldn’t be overly trendy. That’s mostly to protect the mark.

A trendy logo will force you to redesign frequently if trends change so that design isn’t dated. How will you establish a purposeful and memorable brand design if it is constantly changing?

The Spotify logo, above, is a good example because it has a flat style and bright color – both trending design elements – but the mark isn’t …

Managing Multiple Backgrounds with Custom Properties

One cool thing about CSS custom properties is that they can be a part of a value. Let’s say you’re using multiple backgrounds to pull off a a design. Each background will have its own color, image, repeat, position, etc. It can be verbose!

You have four images:

body {
  
  background-position:
    top 10px left 10px,
    top 10px right 10px,
    bottom 10px right 10px,
    bottom 10px left 10px;
  
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  
  background-image:
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg),
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg),
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg),
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);
  
}

You want to add a fifth in a media query:

@media (min-width: 1500px) {
  body {
    /* REPEAT all existing backgrounds, then add a fifth. */
  }
}

That’s going to be super verbose! You’ll have to repeat each of those four images again, then add the fifth. Lots of duplication there.

One possibility is to create a variable for the base set, then add the fifth much more cleanly:

body {
  --baseBackgrounds: 
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg),
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg),
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg),
    url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);

  background-position:
    top 10px left 10px,
    top 10px right 10px,
    bottom 10px right 10px,
    bottom 10px left 10px;
  
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  
  background-image: var(--baseBackgrounds);
}
@media (min-width: 1500px) {
  body {
    background-image: 
      var(--baseBackgrounds),
      url(added-fifth-background.svg);
  }
}

But, it’s really up to you. It might make more sense and be easier manage if you made each background image into a variable, and then pieced them together as needed.

body {
  --bg1: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg);
  --bg2: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg);
  --bg3: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg);
  --bg4: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);
  --bg5: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);
  
  background-image: var(--bg1), var(--bg2), var(--bg3), var(--bg4);
}
@media (min-width: 1500px) {
  body {
    background-image: var(--bg1), var(--bg2), var(--bg3), var(--bg4), var(--bg5);
  }
}

Here’s a basic version of that, including a supports query:

See the Pen
Multiple BGs with Custom Properties
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Dynamically changing just the part of a value is a huge strength of CSS custom properties!

Note, too, that with backgrounds, it might be best to include the entire shorthand as the variable. That way, it’s much easier to piece everything together at once, rather than needing something like…

--bg_1_url: url();
--bg_1_size: 100px;
--bg_1_repeat: no-repeat;
/* etc. */

It’s easier to put all of the …

Here’s A Practical Way To Upgrade An Old Computer

Is your old computer driving you nuts? Are you dying to get rid of it because it’s so slow? Well, stop right there. You know why? According to the leading data recovery company, you don’t really have to get rid of your old computer, at least, not just yet. There is a way to rekindle the love for your old computer.

According to the Hard Drive Recovery Associates or HDRA, you can make a solid upgrade to your aging computer with the use of a solid-state drive or SSD.

Considering a solid upgrade for your old computer is critical. You can’t expect the hard drive of your computer to be in great working condition at all times. The hard drive can eventually crash because of its wear and tear over the years. When your hard drive crashes, your invaluable data go right with it.

HDRA spokesperson, Jack Edwards shares on a recent news post that the components of a hard drive are prone to fail over the years. So, take it from Jack. Don’t expect the hard drive of your old computer to perform well because at some point, it won’t. As a matter of fact, it’s probably struggling already. Don’t wait for it to crash. That probably is the best advice from the guys at HDRA.

This advice comes in timely as more and more consumers are becoming aware of the valuable services of the HDRA.

Irvine, California-based Hard Drive Recovery Associates (HDRA) is pleased to acknowledge a recent increase in the amount of support and positive feedback shown by their community.

The Irvine company is well known within the community, and this recognition increases with each day as more customers share their experiences with each other regarding Hard Drive Recovery Associates’ services. Residents continue to make appointments to contract the company’s services—and HDRA affirms that they are the best chance clients have of recovering any important information from their Hard Disk Drives (HDD) and Solid State Drives (SSD).

(Via: https://harddrivefailurerecoveryblog.blogspot.com/)

So, go right ahead and upgrade …

How To Enable Minimize On Click Feature For Ubuntu Dock Icons

We can pin our favorite and most frequently used applications on the Dock to quickly launch them in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS desktop. By default, Ubuntu dock is found in the left hand side of the...

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Build a Chat App Using React Hooks in 100 Lines of Code

We’ve looked at React Hooks before, around here at CSS-Tricks. I have an article that introduces them as well that illustrates how to use them to create components through functions. Both articles are good high-level overviews about the way they work, but they open up a lot of possibilities, too.

So, that’s what we’re going to do in this article. We’re going to see how hooks make our development process easier and faster by building a chat application.

Specifically, we are building a chat application using Create React App. While doing so, we will be using a selection of React Hooks to simplify the development process and to remove a lot of boilerplate code that’s unnecessary for the work.

There are several open source Reacts hooks available and we’ll be putting those to use as well. These hooks can be directly consumed to build features that otherwise would have taken more of code to create. They also generally follow well-recognized standards for any functionality. In effect, this increases the efficiency of writing code and provides secure functionalities.

Let’s look at the requirements

The chat application we are going to build will have the following features:

  • Get a list of past messages sent from the server
  • Connect to a room for group chatting
  • Get updates when people disconnect from or connect to a room
  • Send and receive messages

We’re working with a few assumptions as we dive in:

  • We’ll consider the server we are going to use as a blackbox. Don’t worry about it working perfectly as we’re going to communicate with it using simple sockets.
  • All the styles are contained in a single CSS file, can be copied to the src directory. All the styles used within the app are linked in the repository.

Getting set up for work

OK, we’re going to want to get our development environment ready to start writing code. First off, React requires both Node and npm. You can set them up here.

Let’s spin up a new project from the Terminal:…

50+ Best Slab Serif Fonts of 2019

Slab serif fonts can be used for a variety of purposes, ranging from general body text to headlines, to display copy. It’s a typography variant that has been used widely for digital as well as print purposes, and devices such as Amazon Kindle even use a slab serif as their default font.

In order to celebrate this amazing subtype, we have gathered 40+ amazing slab serif fonts that you can use for your next design project. They’re bold, beautiful, and carry plenty of impact. All of the font packs included consist of different variants and weights that give you plenty of scope to experiment in your designs. Let’s take a look!

What is a Slab Serif Font?

A serif font is quite easy to recognize. They are the fonts that have small extended lines at the edges of its characters, also known as serifs.

Slab serif is a type of a serif font. However, unlike serif fonts that feature smaller and thin serifs at the end of letters, slab serif fonts have larger and much thicker serifs. They also come in all shapes and sizes, including blocky serifs and serifs with rounded edges.

Slab serif fonts are used in all sorts of designs from poster titles to logos, signage, website headers, and much more.

Top Pick

Bw Glenn Slab Serif Font Family

Bw Glenn Slab Serif Font Family

Bw Glenn is a family of slab serif fonts featuring a modern and professional design, which makes it a suitable choice for all kinds of business, creative, and branding designs.

The font comes with 8 different weights ranging from hairline thin to black bold. Each weight also has its own italic version as well. This makes the total of typefaces to 16.

Why This Is A Top Pick

This font family comes from an experienced designer named Alberto Romanos. But what makes the font special is its multipurpose design. You’ll be able to use this font family with various types of design projects.

Kula – Modern Slab Serif Font

Kula - Modern Slab Serif Font

Kula is an elegant and modern slab serif font …

What’s New for Designers, July 2019

It’s hard to stay focused this time of year. With vacations coming up (or having recently passed) it’s easy to get distracted from work-related tasks. For that reason, this month’s roundup is full of design tools plus a few design diversions that you can have fun with.

404 Illustrations

Have you ever wanted to create a cool 404 page but didn’t have the time or inspiration? 404 Illustrations takes all the work out of it for you with funky and trendy illustrations for lost website users. Each illustration comes with a cute description as well and they are free to use. The designers promise more illustrations in the future.

Spotlight

Spotlight is a lightbox gallery library that’s lightweight, easy to run, and has no dependencies. It literally runs from the download without additional JavaScript, HTML snippets, additional CSS resources, images or assets, and no additional handling of dynamic content.

Eva Design System

Eva is a free and open-source design system that’s adaptable to your needs and team. It works with Sketch and provides symbols and style configurations. The system allows you to design and code using a quick process that can eliminate repetitive work.

Screenzy

Screenzy is a tool for creating and editing screenshots quickly. Just paste an image or URL and use on-screen settings to adjust the image, add text or choose from one of 5 pre-set options.

Drag and Drop Sticky

Scott Kellum created a cool drag and drop sticky note element with no JavaScript. It works as a textarea element and as you move it around, technically you are just resizing a the textarea and the “note” follows.

Freezeframe.js

Freezeframe.js lets you pause animated gifs and then reanimate on a hover, mouse click, touch event, or another manual trigger. The new version of this tool no longer uses jQuery and functions thanks to modern JavaScript.

Space Shooter

Space Shooter is a fun pen by Andrew Rubin that’s a good distraction when you are trying to work through a design problem and a fun bit of inspiration. You …

Popular Design News of the Week: July 8, 2019 – July 14, 2019

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

Web Designers Create the Most Annoying UI Ever

 

Ad-Free Internet by Firefox

 

Creating the Perfect Color Palette for a Website

 

Menu (or not)

 

Web Design Color Trends for 2019

 

Site Design: The Atlas of Moons

 

The Twelfth Fourth

 

Bringing New CSS Techniques to Production

 

Design Principles are Dead

 

My Approach to On-Page SEO in 2019

 

How to Run a Small Social Network Site for your Friends

 

Google’s Taking Another Crack at Building a Social Network

 

It’s Never Going to Be Perfect, so Just Get it Done

 

No, not “everyone is a Designer”

 

Niice Insights

 

How We Used UI/UX to Confront the Climate Crisis

 

Canvas UI Kit: A UI Kit for your Growing Business – For Sketch & Figma

 

JavaScript Classes – A Friendly Introduction

 

Eva Design System: Deep Learning Color Generator

 

Awesome Stranger Things Fan Art

 

Why Information Architecture in UX Process is a Necessity

 

How to Build a Bulletproof Product Design Strategy

 

Google has a Fun Wimbledon Easter Egg You Can Play

 

You’re Getting Screwed on Amazon Prime Day

 

It’s Never Too Late to Be Successful and Happy

 

Want more? No problem! Keep track of top design news from around the web with Webdesigner News.

Source

Position Sticky and Table Headers

You can’t position: sticky; a <thead>. Nor a <tr>. But you can sticky a <th>, which means you can make sticky headers inside a regular ol’ <table>. This is tricky stuff, because if you didn’t know this weird quirk, it would be hard to blame you. It makes way more sense to sticky a parent element like the table header rather than each individiaul element in a row.

The issue boils down to the fact that stickiness requires position: relative to work and that doesn’t apply to <thead> and <tr> in the CSS 2.1 spec.

There are two very extreme reactions to this, should you need to implement sticky table headers and not be aware of the <th> workaround.

  • Don’t use table markup at all. Instead, use different elements (<div>s and whatnot) and other CSS layout methods to replicate the style of a table, but not locked out of using position: relative and creating position: sticky parent elements.
  • Use table elements, but totally remove all their styling defaults with new display values.

The first is dangerous because you aren’t using semantic and accessible elements for the content to be read and navigated. The second is almost the same. You can go that route, but need to be really careful to re-apply semantic roles.

Anyway, none of that matters if you just stick (get it?!) to using a sticky value on those <th> elements.

See the Pen
Sticky Table Headers with CSS
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

It’s probably a bit weird to have table headers as a row in the middle of a table, but it’s just illustrating the idea. I was imagining colored header bars separating players on different sports teams or something.

Anytime I think about data tables, I also think about how tricky it can be to make them responsive. Fortunately, there are a variety of ways, all depending on the best way to group and explore the data in them.

The post Position Sticky

Weekly News for Designers № 496

Add Cool Effects with CSS Blend Mode – Blend modes can replicate effects from the likes of Photoshop and other image editors.
Add Cool Effects with CSS Blend Mode

CSS Lists, Markers, And Counters – Check out some interesting methods for styling your lists.
CSS Lists, Markers, And Counters

Using HTML Validator Badges Again – Why those old badges may still be of some use.
Using HTML Validator Badges Again

Bounds.js – A script for asynchronous boundary detection that can be used for effects such as lazy loading.
Bounds.js

a11y-css-reset – A set of global CSS rules to help improve the accessibility of your projects.
a11y-css-reset

Building WordPress Websites That Better Respect User Privacy – Some things to keep in mind when it comes to user data and WordPress.
Building WordPress Websites That Better Respect User Privacy

Popups: 10 Problematic Trends and Alternatives – Show this to your clients the next time they really want a popup.
Popups: 10 Problematic Trends and Alternatives

Building a Conference Schedule with CSS Grid – A very practical use-case for the CSS layout technique.
Building a Conference Schedule with CSS Grid

Variable Fonts for Developers – Demonstrations that show the power of the latest font technologies.
Variable Fonts for Developers

Menus with “Dynamic Hit Areas” – Some tricks that make flyout menus easier to use.
Menus with “Dynamic Hit Areas”

Learn Bootstrap 4 in 5 minutes – A look at the most important changes in version 4 of the popular framework.
Learn Bootstrap 4 in 5 minutes

The Tiny Short Animation Trend in Web Design – Examples of attention-grabbing animations that don’t waste the user’s precious time.
The Tiny Short Animation Trend in Web Design

Eva Design System: Deep Learning Color Generator – Choose your brand’s base color, and this tool provides an array of complementary shades.
Eva Design System: Deep Learning Color Generator

GIT.WTF!?! – A curated resource that offers solutions for common Git-related issues.
GIT.WTF!?!

Bringing new CSS techniques to production – Things to consider when implementing the latest CSS goodies on your site.
Bringing new CSS techniques to production

User Inyerface – A challenging game of user interactions and design patterns.
User Inyerface

Follow Speckyboy on Twitter or Facebook for a daily does of web design resources and freebies.

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