Let’s do a little step-by-step of a situation where you can’t quite do what seems to make sense, but you can still get it done with CSS trickery. In this case, it’ll be applying a shadow to a shape.

You make a box

.tag {
  background: #FB8C00;
  color: #222;
  font: bold 32px system-ui;
  padding: 2rem 3rem 2rem 4rem;
}

You fashion it into a nice tag shape

You use clip-path because it’s great for that.

.tag {
  /* ... */
  clip-path: polygon(30px 0%, 100% 0%, 100% 100%, 30px 100%, 0 50%)
}

You want a shadow on it, so you…

Try to use box-shadow.

.tag {
  /* ... */
  box-shadow: 5px 5px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
}

But it doesn’t work. Nothing shows up. You think you’re going crazy. You assume you have the syntax wrong. You don’t. The problem is that clip-path is cutting it off.

You can drop-shadow a parent element instead

There is a filter that does shadows as well: drop-shadow(). But you can’t use it directly on the element because the clip-path will cut it off as well. So you make a parent:

<span class="tag-wrap">
  <span class="tag">
    Tag
  </span>
</span>

You can’t use box-shadow on that parent either, because the parent is still a rectangle and the shadow will look wrong. But you can use filter, and the shadow will follow the shape.

See the Pen
Shadow on Shape
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

That’s all.

The post Using “box shadows” and clip-path together appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

from CSS-Tricks https://css-tricks.com/using-box-shadows-and-clip-path-together/

Using “box shadows” and clip-path together
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