30+ Best Portrait Photoshop Actions

Retouching and enhancing portrait photos is a time-consuming task, and starting from scratch with every photo can be frustrating. Using a portrait Photoshop Action can save time, and give you a beautiful result with a few clicks. Let’s dive into some of the best portrait Photoshop Actions available today.

These Photoshop Actions help you save time and improve your workflow when editing a portrait photo. You can use them to instantly retouch photos, add makeup, enhance colors, add effects, adjust toning, and much more with just a single click. Say hello to a faster, simpler workflow (and some impressive end results!). And if you’re looking for more advice and guidance on using these, our Photoshop Actions feature is a great place to start!

3 Tips for Editing Portrait Photos

If you’re new to editing portrait photos, these tips will help you get a better understanding of how the editing process works.

1. Try to Use RAW Images

As you know, JPG is a file format that uses compression to try and reduce the size of your images while preserving the quality of the image. As a result, the JPG file format sacrifices some data and quality elements captured by the sensor of your camera in exchange for convenience.

This is why most professional photographers use the RAW file format. This format captures photos in much higher quality without affecting the quality of the image whatsoever. Even most modern smartphones now have the option to enable RAW file format.

Use it whenever you can to capture high-quality images so when you edit them in Photoshop, you’ll have a much better and uncompressed image to work with.

2. Master the Art of Toning

Toning is the process of adjusting the color balance, brightness, and contrast, and saturation levels to achieve the perfect balance in your photos. This process usually differs from one photo to another based on certain conditions like lighting conditions and camera settings. When it comes to portraits, this also applies to skin toning as well.

Whichever process you follow …

Using KPIs to Improve Web Content

Tracking content performance is the key to a successful campaign, but you can’t do that unless you know which metrics to track.

How do you measure whether a content piece (blog post, ebook, social media post, etc.) is meeting the goals it needs to? In order to meet these goals, you’ll need measurable indicators that can help you gauge the progress and make any necessary adjustments. These measurable indicators are known as Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

A KPI is a…metric that helps you measure performance

A KPI is a measurement or metric that helps you measure performance (for example, of a blog post) relative to the goals you want to achieve. When setting up KPIs, it’s important to be focused and set up KPIs that directly lead to your goal.

Focusing on the wrong set of KPIs can give you an inaccurate view of how your campaigns are performing. Far too many marketers have encountered disaster because they were tracking the wrong KPIs…resulting in large amounts of wasted budget and poor results.

With the correct KPIs set, you’ll be positioned to ensure your campaigns are highly successful.

How to Choose the Correct KPIs

There’s no one-size fits all KPI – the right one depends on what you’re doing and how you’re doing it. Keep the following factors and tips in mind when you’re setting up KPIs for your content marketing campaigns:

Set Clear Business Goals

The primary function of KPIs is to help your content achieve your business goals by measuring their progress and contribution. As such, your KPIs can only work if you have clear and specific business goals that you want your content piece or campaign to achieve, such as:

  • Acquire new customers;
  • Increase ecommerce revenue;
  • Generate more marketing qualified leads (MQLs);
  • Generate more sales qualified leads (SQLs);
  • Generate more leads that convert into a purchase.

Understand Your Revenue Model & Sales Process

Websites typically fall into one of three broad business types: ad-driven, ecommerce, and leads-driven. This article will focus primarily on businesses who need to generate …

Grid, content re-ordering and accessibility

Take this:

<ol>
  <li>Get hungry</li>
  <li>Order pizza</li>
  <li>Eat pizza</li>
</ol>

That HTML ends up in the DOM that way (and thus how it is is exposed to assistive technology), and by default, those list items are also visually shown in that order. In most layout situations, the visual order will match that DOM order. Do nothing, and the list items will flow in the block direction of the document. Apply flexbox, and it will flow in the inline direction of the document.

But flexbox and grid also allow you to muck it up. Now take this:

ol { 
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row-reverse;
}

In this case, the DOM order still makes sense, but the visual order is all wrong. It’s not just row-reverse. There are a number of flexbox and grid properties that can get involved and confuse things: the order property, flowing items into columns instead of rows, and positioning items specifically in unusual orders, among others. Even absolute positioning could cause the same trouble.

Manuel Matuzovic says:

If the visual order and the DOM order don’t match, it can irritate and confuse users up to a point where the experience is so bad that the site is unusable.

Rachel Andrew highlights this issue (including things we’ve published) as a big issue, and hopes we can get tools at the CSS level to help.

I think this is something we sorely need to address at a CSS level. We need to provide a way to allow the tab and reading order to follow the visual order. Source order is a good default, if you are taking advantage of normal flow, a lot of the time following the source is exactly what you want. However not always, not at every breakpoint. If we don’t give people a solution for this, we will end up with a mess. We’ve given people these great tools, and now I feel as if I’m having to tell people not to use them.

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The post Grid,

Using Cypress to Write Tests for a React Application

End-to-end tests are written to assert the flow of an application from start to finish. Instead of handling the tests yourself — you know, manually clicking all over the application — you can write a test that runs as you build the application. That’s what we call continuous integration and it’s a beautiful thing. Write some code, save it, and let tooling do the dirty work of making sure it doesn’t break anything.

Cypress is just one end-to-end testing framework that does all that clicking work for us and that’s what we’re going to look at in this post. It’s really for any modern JavaScript library, but we’re going to integrate it with React in the examples.

Let’s set up an app to test

In this tutorial, we will write tests to cover a todo application I’ve built. You can clone the repository to follow along as we plug it into Cypress.

git clone git@github.com:kinsomicrote/cypress-react-tutorial.git

Navigate into the application, and install the dependencies:

cd cypress-react-tutorial
yarn install

Cypress isn’t part of the dependencies, but you can install it by running this:

yarn add cypress --dev

Now, run this command to open Cypress:

node_modules/.bin/cypress open

Typing that command to the terminal over and over can get exhausting, but you can add this script to the package.json file in the project root:

"cypress": "cypress open"

Now, all you have to do is do npm run cypress once and Cypress will be standing by at all times. To have a feel of what the application we’ll be testing looks like, you can start the React application by running yarn start.

We will start by writing a test to confirm that Cypress works. In the cypress/integration folder, create a new file called init.spec.js. The test asserts that true is equal to true. We only need it to confirm that’s working to ensure that Cypress is up and running for the entire application.

describe('Cypress', () => {
  it('is working', () => {
    expect(true).to.equal(true)
  })
})

You should have a list of …

Claim Your Free .Design Domain

Everyone is familiar with .com and .net, but did you know you get your own free .design domain?

Because it’s a fairly new domain, there are still plenty of short .design names available. So the good news is, you can shorten or improve your existing branding by switching to the .design domain. Eg. johnsmithdesign.com -> johnsmith.design

You can also get your own unique email address such as hola@yourname.design or you can even use it as a clever redirect to another site, like a Behance profile.

Get Your FREE .design Domain

We have teamed up with Porkbun to offer all Webdesigner Depot subscribers a free .design domain name. The first year is free, and yearly renewals will be just $35 instead of the $70 offered at some registrars.

You also get:

  • Free email hosting – you can add an email address (or multiple addresses!) that matches your domain name. For example, anne@goldsmith.design or info@goldsmith.design, or any other name you want.
  • SSL Security – An SSL certificate will encrypt your visitors’ sensitive data, and also display your site with “HTTPS” in your address bar, which will let visitors know that you’ve made their security your top priority. You’ll also avoid the “NOT SECURE” label from Google.
  • Free WHOIS Privacy – Your contact information will be private, and protected forever. Other registrars charge you for this. PorkBun won’t.
  • Free website builder – If you want to build your .design website with no code, you can build it for free using their site builder, powered by Weebly. And with this option you don’t have to pay for website hosting.
  • Free domain connection – Whether you built your website (or plan to build it) with other services like WIX, SquareSpace, or Weebly, you can easily connect your .design domain to your website platform. Your website content will stay exactly the same, but you’ll have a modern .design domain name for your website to show off!

Here’s your chance to get a free website domain name that reflects what you do and helps you …

Everything You Need to Know About Date in JavaScript

Date is weird in JavaScript. It gets on our nerves so much that we reach for libraries (like Date-fns and Moment) the moment (ha!) we need to work with date and time.

But we don’t always need to use libraries. Date can actually be quite simple if you know what to watch out for. In this article, I’ll walk you through everything you need to know about the Date object.

First, let’s acknowledge the existence of timezones.

Timezones

There are hundreds of timezones in our world. In JavaScript, we only care about two—Local Time and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

  • Local time refers to the timezone your computer is in.
  • UTC is synonymous with Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) in practice.

By default, almost every date method in JavaScript (except one) gives you a date/time in local time. You only get UTC if you specify UTC.

With this, we can talk about creating dates.

Creating a date

You can create a date with new Date(). There are four possible ways to use new Date():

  1. With a date-string
  2. With date arguments
  3. With a timestamp
  4. With no arguments

The date-string method

In the date-string method, you create a date by passing a date-string into new Date.

new Date('1988-03-21')

We tend towards the date-string method when we write dates. This is natural because we’ve been using date strings all our lives.

If I write 21-03-1988, you have no problems deducing it’s 21st of March, 1988. Yeah? But if you write 21-03-1988 in JavaScript, you get Invalid Date.

new Date('21-03-1988') returns Invalid Date.

There’s a good reason for this.

We interpret date strings differently in different parts of the world. For example 11-06-2019 is either 11th June, 2019 or 6th November 2019. But you can’t be sure which one I’m referring to, unless you know the date system I’m using.

In JavaScript, if you want to use a date string, you need to use a format that’s accepted worldwide. One of these formats is …

What’s Your Backup System In Case Your Hard Drive Crashes?

What if your hard drive crashes? What would you do? Would you worry? If not, you probably have a backup system in place.

All you really need is a good backup system to survive a hard drive crash. Unfortunately, not everybody has a backup system. For folks who already have one, they’ve probably had to experience a hard drive crash to realize the need for a backup system.

Such is the case with Harrison Jacobs, an international correspondent who learned the hard way. He had never had a backup system. So, when his hard drive crashed, he lost a lot.

I’ve made a lot of mistakes since I left New York to travel around the world as Business Insider’s international correspondent. By far the worst was when the external hard drive with all of my photos, videos, and interviews failed.

(Via: https://www.businessinsider.com/back-up-photos-google-photos-external-hard-drive-2019-1)

Thinking that hard drives don’t fail is a mistake most people are guilty of. They rely so much on their hard drives that they take it for granted. That’s exactly what happened to Harrison.

There was one mistake I made during my first six months on the road that was not funny at all. Even now, when I think about it, I get a little sick to my stomach.

It happened innocuously enough. I was editing photos while sitting on a couch in an Airbnb when I shifted a little too much and knocked my external hard drive, a Seagate Expansion Portable Hard Drive. The drive dismounted and, rather than keep editing photos, I went off to sleep.

When I plugged it in two days later, I heard a clicking sound. After trying every online-forum solution possible, I brought it to a data specialist and got the worst news: a head crash, the worst kind of hard drive failure possible. Even if the hard drive had been semi-recoverable, it would have cost me hundreds, if not thousands of dollars to recover the data.

Thanks to one bad jolt, I lost three months’ worth of photos, interviews, and

30+ Best Watercolor Background Textures

Using watercolor backgrounds and textures, with a watercolor painting effect, is a trend that took the world of design by surprise. These unique, colorful backgrounds can work beautifully with typography and simple design elements to give any design a fun edge.

The background is an important part of any design project. Whether it’s a website design, an app, graphic, or even a slideshow, the background is the foundation that helps you highlight the core content of a design. Which is why should always be careful when choosing a background for your designs.

To show you how great these backgrounds can look, we’ve handpicked a set of the best watercolor backgrounds and textures you can use for various kinds of projects — all of which can be downloaded and used in your own projects!

Our Favorite Watercolor Backgrounds

These are our favorite top picks of the entire list featuring both premium and free backgrounds.

Top Premium Pick

8 Colorful Watercolor Backgrounds

8 Colorful Watercolor Backgrounds

Featuring 8 different backgrounds with creative and colorful watercolor textures, this bundle will allow you to give a more authentic look to your designs.

The backgrounds in this pack are available in 3500 × 2300 resolution JPG file format.

Why This Is A Top Pick

The natural mix of the beautiful colors and the realistic texture is what makes this bundle of watercolor backgrounds stand out from the crowd. It’s the perfect choice for creative and professional designs such as website and app backgrounds as well as greeting card designs.

Top Free Pick

15 Free Colorful Watercolor Textures

15 Free Colorful Watercolor Textures

This bundle comes with 15 different watercolor background textures featuring colorful and authentic watercolor designs.

The textures are available in 6000 x 4000 resolution and they are perfect for crafting backgrounds for all types of creative design projects.

Why This Is A Top Pick

Even though this bundle is free to download, the background images are available in high-resolution and with a wide variety of texture and colorful designs. Which makes this collection a worthy pack of backgrounds to have among your