What’s Your Backup System In Case Your Hard Drive Crashes?

What if your hard drive crashes? What would you do? Would you worry? If not, you probably have a backup system in place.

All you really need is a good backup system to survive a hard drive crash. Unfortunately, not everybody has a backup system. For folks who already have one, they’ve probably had to experience a hard drive crash to realize the need for a backup system.

Such is the case with Harrison Jacobs, an international correspondent who learned the hard way. He had never had a backup system. So, when his hard drive crashed, he lost a lot.

I’ve made a lot of mistakes since I left New York to travel around the world as Business Insider’s international correspondent. By far the worst was when the external hard drive with all of my photos, videos, and interviews failed.

(Via: https://www.businessinsider.com/back-up-photos-google-photos-external-hard-drive-2019-1)

Thinking that hard drives don’t fail is a mistake most people are guilty of. They rely so much on their hard drives that they take it for granted. That’s exactly what happened to Harrison.

There was one mistake I made during my first six months on the road that was not funny at all. Even now, when I think about it, I get a little sick to my stomach.

It happened innocuously enough. I was editing photos while sitting on a couch in an Airbnb when I shifted a little too much and knocked my external hard drive, a Seagate Expansion Portable Hard Drive. The drive dismounted and, rather than keep editing photos, I went off to sleep.

When I plugged it in two days later, I heard a clicking sound. After trying every online-forum solution possible, I brought it to a data specialist and got the worst news: a head crash, the worst kind of hard drive failure possible. Even if the hard drive had been semi-recoverable, it would have cost me hundreds, if not thousands of dollars to recover the data.

Thanks to one bad jolt, I lost three months’ worth of photos, interviews, and

Safety Tips To Keep Hackers Away

Hackers are everywhere. You’ll never really know when they’ll strike. When they do, they will take away vital data from your computer.

No one wants to get hacked. Unfortunately, it happens. Hackers are heartless people. That’s why it’s important to understand what they do and how they do it.

A recent public forum explained what hacking is all about.

What is hacking and how can it be avoided?

These two questions were among many addressed on Tuesday at a public forum titled “You Have Been Hacked!” featuring Charles J. Lesko Jr., director of graduate studies in the ECU College of Engineering and Technology.

“Hacking” refers to the act of someone gaining unauthorized access into a computer or network, Lesko said.

“Anything that’s got digital capability nowadays has the ability for someone to — in some way, shape or form — alter,” he said. “That’s the age that we’re living in now.”

(Via: http://www.reflector.com/News/2019/04/10/You-ve-Been-Hacked.html)

Why do hackers do what they do? Here’s what Lesko has to say about that:

There are many nefarious reasons for hacking, but the primary one is to get your money, Lasko said.

(Via: http://www.reflector.com/News/2019/04/10/You-ve-Been-Hacked.html)

Lesko also offers some safety tips to keep the hackers away.

Never respond to a request from any organization or a business that sends an email asking you for your user ID and password, Lesko said.

“That’s an immediate delete,” he said. “Unless you trust (something) explicitly, don’t (click on it).”

Know the difference between “http” and “https,” letters that appear in the address of a website, Lesko said. The “s” indicates that the website connection is secure.

Regarding passwords, it is best to have ones that are complex and secure, Lesko said. People tend to use simple passwords, even as simple as “password” and “pa$$word,” because they are easy to remember. But they are also easy for hackers to break into.

(Via: http://www.reflector.com/News/2019/04/10/You-ve-Been-Hacked.html)

The key is, never trust emails that ask you to share or update your personal information on the attached link. To start with, organizations or …

Protection For The Ultimate Data Storage

We are all dependent on data. No matter who we are, we rely on data to make it through the day. Data make the world go around nowadays.

We have so much data that we are always on the lookout for the best storage. One of the most common data storages for regular folks like you and me is a computer or laptop. There’s a lot of data, we just can’t live without, stored in our computer or maybe laptop. That’s just for regular folks like you and me.

Photographers and videographers need humongous data storage for all their work files. Data storage is an issue they face constantly. That’s why the G-Speed Shuttle with Thunderbolt seems to be the ultimate storage for them.

The G-Speed Shuttle with Thunderbolt a very interesting proposition, both for stills photographers and videographers. Yes, it is big, bulky and costly, but it’s as fast as a regular USB-C SSD drive and offers storage capacities you just don’t get with regular external drives.

(Via: https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/reviews/g-speed-shuttle-4bay-thunderbolt-3-16tb-review)

While it seems to be a costly solution for a huge data storage, it might just be the ultimate data storage photographers and videographers are looking for.

Photographers are always running out of storage space, and there can’t be many of us who don’t need an external drive to supplement the computer’s internal storage.

The traditional choice is to pick an external hard drive, but even the best portable hard drives are pretty slow for bulk image transfers and video editing, and while regular desktop hard drives are faster, even these have their limits. Another option is to invest in SSD (solid state storage) instead, but while this is super-fast, it’s also super-expensive. There is a third option – a desktop RAID system like the G-Technology G-Speed Shuttle.

(Via: https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/reviews/g-speed-shuttle-4bay-thunderbolt-3-16tb-review)

According to Digitalcameraworld.com, its huge potential storage is ideal for speedy transfer of data and data redundancy. The G-Speed Shuttle with Thunderbolt is also portable, which makes it very convenient for photographers on the go.

If you’re familiar …

Hard Drive Failure: How Prepared Are You For it?

Let’s talk about hard drive failure. It’s a topic we all want to avoid, right? Well, who really wants to talk about hard drive failure?

We all want to avoid the topic but when it happens to us, we think the world is going to end. Okay, that obviously is an exaggeration but you know what I mean. As much as no one wants to talk about a hard drive failure, no one want to deal with it as well.

The reality is that we all have to talk about it so that we can deal with it when it happens. So, let’s talk about it and see what computer experts, like Bob Levitus, have to say about it as well.

According to him;

You are going to lose everything on your Mac hard (or solid state) drive if you don’t back up your files.

Now that World Backup Day (March 31) has come and gone, I feel it is prudent to reiterate the bad things that will happen to your precious data—your photos, videos, essays, proposals, emails, messages, and everything else—if you don’t backup.

(Via: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Your-hard-drive-will-fail-be-prepared-13732648.php)

We might not want to admit but Bob is right. We can all lose everything on our hard drive if it fails. Bob states the simple reason why that day is bound to come.

Your hard or solid-state drive will absolutely and positively fail someday. It probably won’t be today, but the day will definitely come because all disks fail eventually.

(Via: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Your-hard-drive-will-fail-be-prepared-13732648.php)

While it’s hard to tell when that day will come, it will definitely come.

It’s rare that a hard or solid-state drive fails in its first year or two of service (though that’s not unheard of). It’s also rare that something (anything) you do to or install upon your Mac will render its disks unusable. But, while those things are rare, too, they can happen.

(Via: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Your-hard-drive-will-fail-be-prepared-13732648.php)

There’s really no denying that hard drives fail. With computer experts like Bob, weighing in on it, there’s just no …

What It Really Means To Go Paperless

It’s good to go paperless. In this age and age, it’s actually the way to go. Since it’s so easy to digitize files these days, it makes a lot of sense to go paperless. Just think of all the physical space you could save. You wouldn’t have to keep copies of old files in old filing cabinets that take up so much physical space.

Going paperless means getting rid of the clutter. No, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re going to throw everything away. You’d have to digitize all your files first to store in a virtual space. Once you’ve done that, then maybe you could throw away the clutter. It’s really up to you but you would have to be very careful.

An important follow-up to scanning is getting rid of any paper to reduce the chance of identity theft, which saw increased fraud reports in 2018, according to Federal Trade Commission findings. Of the 10 shredders we tested, Wirecutter’s favorite can take up to 10 pages at a time. For most people, the cross-cut model works just fine, but if you have particularly sensitive documents, a micro-cut shredder makes it pretty much impossible to put paper back together.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

You really have to be careful when throwing out old documents. Make sure they’re shredded pretty well. If not, the information of the documents might be misused.

A good example of documents that you could digitize are your tax records. Your tax records over the years probably make up most of the clutter that you can’t seem to get rid of. If you really want to go paperless, you could start digitizing your tax records.

If your tax seasons have involved too much paper wrangling, consider throwing out your file cabinets and going paperless. Everything you have to track for the IRS you can also keep digitally.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

It takes a lot of work to digitize files. Imagine scanning every single file you’ve kept over the years. Nonetheless, you always have to keep in mind …

Good News For Apple Users

Are you an loyal Apple fan? Well, here’s some good news for you, especially if you’re planning to buy a new Mac or you’re already a proud owner of  one.

There’s no need to pay for anything if you want data transferred to your new Mac. The data migration fee has finally been dropped.

After speaking with an Apple Store Operations Specialist, TidBITS reported that the company has dropped the data migration fee charged when users move their content from an old computer to a new Mac.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

That’s really good news because Apple’s data migration fee was quite high. You would really have had to factor that in if, in case, you wanted to upgrade your old Mac to a new one.

Previously, when you went to the Apple Store to upgrade your computer to a new one or had some repairs done, you’d have to pay a whopping $99 to migrate the data to your new device or new hard drive. As first reported by TidBITS on Tuesday, Apple quietly discontinued charging this particular fee.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

So, if you’re seriously considering replacing your old Mac, go right ahead. Now is the perfect time for it.

An Apple Store Operations Specialist told the tech news site that “Beginning April 2, there will be no cost of Data Migrations with the purchase of a new Mac or Data Transfers with a repair.”

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

For tech savvy folks, data transfer from one Mac to another can easily be done.

Nevertheless, if you’re confident in your tech savviness, you could do so yourself at home; Apple offers a set of instructions explaining how to move content from an old computer — even if it’s a PC — to your new Mac. If you got into the habit of uploading your files to iCloud, there’s no transfer even necessary when you change computers.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

For folks, who have no technical knowledge or patience to deal with data transfer, they can always just go to an …

A Look Into Tomorrow’s Hard Disk

Data is best stored on hard disks. It is easier to access when data stored in a hard disk. Of course, they can also be stored online. While there is nothing wrong with storing data online, you would have to rely on the internet to access your files.

With a hard disk, there’s no need to rely on the internet to access your files. Since it’s very convenient to use, a hard disk with huge data storage capacity is always in demand. The thing is, a hard disk with huge data capacity might not be portable. If it’s not portable, then it won’t be that convenient to take everywhere.

Ideally, the size of a hard disk should remain small as its data storage capacity increases. At the moment, that kind of hard disk is a myth. Hopefully, tomorrow, it becomes a reality. Here’s a look at tomorrow’s hard disk.

A recent breakthrough discovery of the world’s first high-temperature single-molecule magnet (SMM) opens doors to future exciting developments in massive storage capacity increase in hard disks without increasing their physical size.

Before the publication of the study Magnetic Hysteresis up to 80 Kelvin in a Dysprosium Metallocene Single-Molecule Magnet led by Professor of Chemistry Richard Layfield at the University of Sussex in England, it was only possible to synthesize single-molecule magnets with blocking temperatures that were reached by cooling with considerable expensive and scarce liquid helium.

The team at the University of Sussex in collaboration with Sun-Yat Sen University in China and the University of Jyväskylä in Finland, reported a new single-molecule magnet (SMM) which is a type of material that retains magnetic information up to a characteristic blocking temperature.

(Via: https://interestingengineering.com/first-high-temperature-single-molecule-magnet-can-revolutionize-hard-disk-storage-capacity)

The characteristics of the SMMs are paving way to a very tiny device that could store huge data.

SMMs are molecules with the characteristic of remembering the direction of a magnetic field that has been applied to them over relatively long periods of time once the magnetic field is switched off. This makes possible to write information into

The Black Hole Becomes Visible With Half A Ton Of Hard Drives

Brace yourself. You can finally see how a black hole looks like. Up until today, no one really knew how a black hole looked like.

Finally, the day has come but it was no easy task.

The newly released image of a black hole (below) is a watershed moment for physics. Finally, we can put some of Einstein’s most famous predictions from a century ago to the test, but it was not as easy as pointing a big lens at the M87 galaxy and pressing a button. It took years of work and the collaboration of more than 200 scientists to make it happen. It also required about half a ton of hard drives.

(Via: https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/289423-it-took-half-a-ton-of-hard-drives-to-store-eht-black-hole-image-data_)

What’s interesting about how the snapshot of the black hole was the length of time it took to put it together. It took years and a network of telescopes from around the world to capture the first real image of the black hole.

Data collection for the historic black hole image began in 2017 with a coordinated effort called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). That isn’t a single instrument but rather a collection of seven radio telescopes from around the world. The EHT used a principle called interferometry to combine the capacity of all those telescopes, creating a “virtual” telescope the size of the Earth.

The EHT had to collect a huge volume of data to deliver us this one image. Dan Marrone, Associate Professor of Astronomy at the University of Arizona says the EHT team had to install specialized super-fast data recorders on the various radio telescopes to handle the influx of measurements.

The now-famous image of a black hole comes from data collected over a period of seven days. At the end of that observation, the EHT didn’t have an image — it had a mountain of data.

(Via: https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/289423-it-took-half-a-ton-of-hard-drives-to-store-eht-black-hole-image-data_)

The data collected was just too massive for the internet to handle. The hard drives had to be flown by plane.

According to Marrone, 5 petabytes is equal to 5,000

Deleted Data: How To Recover From Windows

Oh, no! You can’t find a file. You’ve looked in all the folders already and you still can’t find it. Did you delete it?

Even if you didn’t mean to, there are times when you accidentally delete data. Deleting data is not just a matter of right clicking on the word delete. As a matter of fact, human errors only rank second when it comes to deleted data.

In a study by StorageCraft with 41 IT professional, 29% agreed that the main cause of data loss is human errors. Many other studies also found that human errors are the second most common reason for data loss across the globe.

(Via: https://www.explosion.com/127691/how-to-recover-deleted-data-from-windows/)

You could end up deleting data even if you didn’t mean to. That’s a fact. Aside from human errors, there are other things to consider.

These errors include accidental deletion, formatting, force shutdown, improper drive or device use, and more. However, data loss may also occur due to following reasons:

  • Hardware Failure
  • Software corruption
  • Malware attacks
  • Power surge and outage
  • Bad sectors/blocks on the drive, Overheating
  • Outdated or corrupt device drivers
  • Theft, System file corruption
  • Natural Disasters.

(Via: https://www.explosion.com/127691/how-to-recover-deleted-data-from-windows/)

That could scare a lot of people but truth be told, deleted data is no big deal. This is especially true on Windows. Explosion author, Nick Guli, stresses the same point as well.

Before we begin, I want to highlight the fact that the recovery of deleted data from a Windows PC isn’t a difficult task if you act promptly and appropriately. With that said, there’s no guarantee that all deleted files can be recovered. Some files may get corrupt if you continue to use your Windows PC or the storage media after data loss—whether deliberately or inadvertently—as it overwrites the deleted files.

(Via: https://www.explosion.com/127691/how-to-recover-deleted-data-from-windows/)

Although there is no guarantee that all data can be recovered, some, if not, most data can be recovered as long as you act on it right away. You have to be open to the fact that some data could get corrupted. …

Cloud Technology: Changing The Way We Store Data

Digital data storage is now convenient. Thanks to the cloud, we can easily store and back up our data. With just the internet, our data can easily transfer from our computer to the cloud.

With the amount of data we work with every single day, it’s important to find ways to store them safely. Cloud technology makes it possible for data to be transferred and stored in a safe place. That’s the reason why it’s becoming very popular these days. As a matter of fact, it might eventually be the way we will all store data.

According to the Cisco Global Cloud Index, by 2021, 94 percent of workloads and compute instances will be processed by cloud data centers, meaning all but 6 percent of our data will be on the cloud.

(Via: https://www.analyticsinsight.net/how-cloud-technology-has-transformed-data-storage/)

Cloud technology has gone a long way. In terms of data storage, cloud services were very limited before. It was limited in such a way that files had to be manually transferred online. The funny part was that each file had to be transferred manually. That led to a lot of clicking and transferring of files online. To make matters worse, each file needed a separate password. Of course, that was years ago.

Cloud technology has made backup services a lot easier these days. As a matter of fact, online backup services nowadays offer automatic file transfer. Cloud technology has made backup services to be more convenient than ever.

The main result of the evolution of personal cloud usage is that 2.7 billion people walk around with devices in their pockets where they can quickly access: conversations threads from five years ago, thousands of high-res pictures, work databases, or see the person ringing their doorbell.

(Via: https://www.analyticsinsight.net/how-cloud-technology-has-transformed-data-storage/)

Cloud technology has also found its way in the workplace.

In our recent cloud migration survey of enterprise professionals across multiple industries, we found that nearly 50 percent of companies have already migrated to the cloud, with 45 percent currently undergoing a migration. As only 5.6 percent