What It Really Means To Go Paperless

It’s good to go paperless. In this age and age, it’s actually the way to go. Since it’s so easy to digitize files these days, it makes a lot of sense to go paperless. Just think of all the physical space you could save. You wouldn’t have to keep copies of old files in old filing cabinets that take up so much physical space.

Going paperless means getting rid of the clutter. No, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re going to throw everything away. You’d have to digitize all your files first to store in a virtual space. Once you’ve done that, then maybe you could throw away the clutter. It’s really up to you but you would have to be very careful.

An important follow-up to scanning is getting rid of any paper to reduce the chance of identity theft, which saw increased fraud reports in 2018, according to Federal Trade Commission findings. Of the 10 shredders we tested, Wirecutter’s favorite can take up to 10 pages at a time. For most people, the cross-cut model works just fine, but if you have particularly sensitive documents, a micro-cut shredder makes it pretty much impossible to put paper back together.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

You really have to be careful when throwing out old documents. Make sure they’re shredded pretty well. If not, the information of the documents might be misused.

A good example of documents that you could digitize are your tax records. Your tax records over the years probably make up most of the clutter that you can’t seem to get rid of. If you really want to go paperless, you could start digitizing your tax records.

If your tax seasons have involved too much paper wrangling, consider throwing out your file cabinets and going paperless. Everything you have to track for the IRS you can also keep digitally.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

It takes a lot of work to digitize files. Imagine scanning every single file you’ve kept over the years. Nonetheless, you always have to keep in mind …

Good News For Apple Users

Are you an loyal Apple fan? Well, here’s some good news for you, especially if you’re planning to buy a new Mac or you’re already a proud owner of  one.

There’s no need to pay for anything if you want data transferred to your new Mac. The data migration fee has finally been dropped.

After speaking with an Apple Store Operations Specialist, TidBITS reported that the company has dropped the data migration fee charged when users move their content from an old computer to a new Mac.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

That’s really good news because Apple’s data migration fee was quite high. You would really have had to factor that in if, in case, you wanted to upgrade your old Mac to a new one.

Previously, when you went to the Apple Store to upgrade your computer to a new one or had some repairs done, you’d have to pay a whopping $99 to migrate the data to your new device or new hard drive. As first reported by TidBITS on Tuesday, Apple quietly discontinued charging this particular fee.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

So, if you’re seriously considering replacing your old Mac, go right ahead. Now is the perfect time for it.

An Apple Store Operations Specialist told the tech news site that “Beginning April 2, there will be no cost of Data Migrations with the purchase of a new Mac or Data Transfers with a repair.”

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

For tech savvy folks, data transfer from one Mac to another can easily be done.

Nevertheless, if you’re confident in your tech savviness, you could do so yourself at home; Apple offers a set of instructions explaining how to move content from an old computer — even if it’s a PC — to your new Mac. If you got into the habit of uploading your files to iCloud, there’s no transfer even necessary when you change computers.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

For folks, who have no technical knowledge or patience to deal with data transfer, they can always just go to an …

A Look Into Tomorrow’s Hard Disk

Data is best stored on hard disks. It is easier to access when data stored in a hard disk. Of course, they can also be stored online. While there is nothing wrong with storing data online, you would have to rely on the internet to access your files.

With a hard disk, there’s no need to rely on the internet to access your files. Since it’s very convenient to use, a hard disk with huge data storage capacity is always in demand. The thing is, a hard disk with huge data capacity might not be portable. If it’s not portable, then it won’t be that convenient to take everywhere.

Ideally, the size of a hard disk should remain small as its data storage capacity increases. At the moment, that kind of hard disk is a myth. Hopefully, tomorrow, it becomes a reality. Here’s a look at tomorrow’s hard disk.

A recent breakthrough discovery of the world’s first high-temperature single-molecule magnet (SMM) opens doors to future exciting developments in massive storage capacity increase in hard disks without increasing their physical size.

Before the publication of the study Magnetic Hysteresis up to 80 Kelvin in a Dysprosium Metallocene Single-Molecule Magnet led by Professor of Chemistry Richard Layfield at the University of Sussex in England, it was only possible to synthesize single-molecule magnets with blocking temperatures that were reached by cooling with considerable expensive and scarce liquid helium.

The team at the University of Sussex in collaboration with Sun-Yat Sen University in China and the University of Jyväskylä in Finland, reported a new single-molecule magnet (SMM) which is a type of material that retains magnetic information up to a characteristic blocking temperature.

(Via: https://interestingengineering.com/first-high-temperature-single-molecule-magnet-can-revolutionize-hard-disk-storage-capacity)

The characteristics of the SMMs are paving way to a very tiny device that could store huge data.

SMMs are molecules with the characteristic of remembering the direction of a magnetic field that has been applied to them over relatively long periods of time once the magnetic field is switched off. This makes possible to write information into

The Black Hole Becomes Visible With Half A Ton Of Hard Drives

Brace yourself. You can finally see how a black hole looks like. Up until today, no one really knew how a black hole looked like.

Finally, the day has come but it was no easy task.

The newly released image of a black hole (below) is a watershed moment for physics. Finally, we can put some of Einstein’s most famous predictions from a century ago to the test, but it was not as easy as pointing a big lens at the M87 galaxy and pressing a button. It took years of work and the collaboration of more than 200 scientists to make it happen. It also required about half a ton of hard drives.

(Via: https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/289423-it-took-half-a-ton-of-hard-drives-to-store-eht-black-hole-image-data_)

What’s interesting about how the snapshot of the black hole was the length of time it took to put it together. It took years and a network of telescopes from around the world to capture the first real image of the black hole.

Data collection for the historic black hole image began in 2017 with a coordinated effort called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). That isn’t a single instrument but rather a collection of seven radio telescopes from around the world. The EHT used a principle called interferometry to combine the capacity of all those telescopes, creating a “virtual” telescope the size of the Earth.

The EHT had to collect a huge volume of data to deliver us this one image. Dan Marrone, Associate Professor of Astronomy at the University of Arizona says the EHT team had to install specialized super-fast data recorders on the various radio telescopes to handle the influx of measurements.

The now-famous image of a black hole comes from data collected over a period of seven days. At the end of that observation, the EHT didn’t have an image — it had a mountain of data.

(Via: https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/289423-it-took-half-a-ton-of-hard-drives-to-store-eht-black-hole-image-data_)

The data collected was just too massive for the internet to handle. The hard drives had to be flown by plane.

According to Marrone, 5 petabytes is equal to 5,000

Deleted Data: How To Recover From Windows

Oh, no! You can’t find a file. You’ve looked in all the folders already and you still can’t find it. Did you delete it?

Even if you didn’t mean to, there are times when you accidentally delete data. Deleting data is not just a matter of right clicking on the word delete. As a matter of fact, human errors only rank second when it comes to deleted data.

In a study by StorageCraft with 41 IT professional, 29% agreed that the main cause of data loss is human errors. Many other studies also found that human errors are the second most common reason for data loss across the globe.

(Via: https://www.explosion.com/127691/how-to-recover-deleted-data-from-windows/)

You could end up deleting data even if you didn’t mean to. That’s a fact. Aside from human errors, there are other things to consider.

These errors include accidental deletion, formatting, force shutdown, improper drive or device use, and more. However, data loss may also occur due to following reasons:

  • Hardware Failure
  • Software corruption
  • Malware attacks
  • Power surge and outage
  • Bad sectors/blocks on the drive, Overheating
  • Outdated or corrupt device drivers
  • Theft, System file corruption
  • Natural Disasters.

(Via: https://www.explosion.com/127691/how-to-recover-deleted-data-from-windows/)

That could scare a lot of people but truth be told, deleted data is no big deal. This is especially true on Windows. Explosion author, Nick Guli, stresses the same point as well.

Before we begin, I want to highlight the fact that the recovery of deleted data from a Windows PC isn’t a difficult task if you act promptly and appropriately. With that said, there’s no guarantee that all deleted files can be recovered. Some files may get corrupt if you continue to use your Windows PC or the storage media after data loss—whether deliberately or inadvertently—as it overwrites the deleted files.

(Via: https://www.explosion.com/127691/how-to-recover-deleted-data-from-windows/)

Although there is no guarantee that all data can be recovered, some, if not, most data can be recovered as long as you act on it right away. You have to be open to the fact that some data could get corrupted. …

Cloud Technology: Changing The Way We Store Data

Digital data storage is now convenient. Thanks to the cloud, we can easily store and back up our data. With just the internet, our data can easily transfer from our computer to the cloud.

With the amount of data we work with every single day, it’s important to find ways to store them safely. Cloud technology makes it possible for data to be transferred and stored in a safe place. That’s the reason why it’s becoming very popular these days. As a matter of fact, it might eventually be the way we will all store data.

According to the Cisco Global Cloud Index, by 2021, 94 percent of workloads and compute instances will be processed by cloud data centers, meaning all but 6 percent of our data will be on the cloud.

(Via: https://www.analyticsinsight.net/how-cloud-technology-has-transformed-data-storage/)

Cloud technology has gone a long way. In terms of data storage, cloud services were very limited before. It was limited in such a way that files had to be manually transferred online. The funny part was that each file had to be transferred manually. That led to a lot of clicking and transferring of files online. To make matters worse, each file needed a separate password. Of course, that was years ago.

Cloud technology has made backup services a lot easier these days. As a matter of fact, online backup services nowadays offer automatic file transfer. Cloud technology has made backup services to be more convenient than ever.

The main result of the evolution of personal cloud usage is that 2.7 billion people walk around with devices in their pockets where they can quickly access: conversations threads from five years ago, thousands of high-res pictures, work databases, or see the person ringing their doorbell.

(Via: https://www.analyticsinsight.net/how-cloud-technology-has-transformed-data-storage/)

Cloud technology has also found its way in the workplace.

In our recent cloud migration survey of enterprise professionals across multiple industries, we found that nearly 50 percent of companies have already migrated to the cloud, with 45 percent currently undergoing a migration. As only 5.6 percent

Damaged Hard Drive Due To Smoke

A damaged hard drive is bad news. You want to avoid that as much as possible. There’s a pretty good chance you’ll lose your data when that happens.

Your data is very important. You’d want to protect it all times. That’s the reason why it’s a must to install a powerful anti-virus and a reliable backup service. Unfortunately, those aren’t enough to really protect your data. When it comes to securing your data, you need to do more than that.

However, security is a much broader category than just that, and it includes both the availability of and the integrity of your information, and a part of that is physical protection. These days, the latest risks we often hear about are things like breaches of data stored in the cloud, or compromised IoT devices. However, it is important to remember that these sorts of risks are in addition to—not instead of—other older and less “sexy” risks, such as hard drive crashes.

(Via: https://www.welivesecurity.com/2019/02/18/smoke-damage-and-hard-drives/)

The hard drive of your computer is probably the last thing you’ll ever think of. To start with, you can’t even see it. So, why bother? Well, you should because your hard drive is where all your precious data go. Your hard drive works very hard to store all your valuable data.

Conventional hard disk drives work by spinning a series of aluminum or glass platters on a spindle driven by an electric motor. And when spun up, they are going pretty fast and with incredibly fine tolerances: hard disk drives used in servers spin their platters at up to 15,000 revolutions per minute (RPM), which works out to around 150 mph (or about 240 kph, for the metrically minded). Just barely above and below these platters float minuscule read-write heads, each less than a millimeter wide, at the end of an actuator arm. How far apart do the actuator arms place the heads from the platters? As little as 3 nanometers, or about 1/25,000th the thickness of a human hair. Read-write heads themselves are so

An Easy Way Recover A Damaged Hard Drive

Your hard drive can get damaged. More often than not, a clicking sound is a sure sign of a damaged hard drive. Once you hear that clicking sound, your hard drive is about to go.

That’s something you don’t want to happen. With all the files stored in your hard drive, you don’t want it damaged. Unfortunately, that is totally impossible. Your hard drive is bound to get damaged.

With digital devices becoming more prevalent for communication, research, and storage purposes, ensuring that one keeps a backup of their data has never been more important. A sudden, unexpected loss of data can be devastating and might mean that thousands of irreplaceable photos or the entirety of a crucial project at work may be gone forever.

(Via: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/4252957)

In the event that you end up with a damaged hard drive, you can always rely on the services of the Hard Drive Recovery Associates.

Hard Drive Recovery Associates offers their customers a way to attempt the recovery of lost data with their data recovery services, and is proud to announce that they have received 5 star reviews on their Google My Business page.

The company offers data recovery for RAID, Mac, and PC hard disks along with SSD drives. They specialize in recovering both damaged and clicking hard drives.

(Via: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/4252957)

Hard drives get damaged at a time when you least expect it. When it happens, your natural tendency is to get really pissed off. Instead of getting any work done, you end up dealing with a damaged hard drive. Precious time just goes down the drain.

To matters worse, you realize the possibility of losing your files. Finally, you panic. You don’t know what to do. How can you possibly recover a damaged hard drive when you’re having a panic attack? Will you ever get back your files from your damaged hard drive? Apparently, you can.

“It’s easy. You might think it’s not but it is. Retrieving data from the hard drive is not as hard as you

There Is Such A Thing As Data Privacy Day

There’s a day for almost everything. For example, there’s a World Backup Day. It’s held every 31st of March. Obviously, this particular day celebrates the importance of backing up data. So, if you’re not aware of such a day, you are now. If you don’t back up your files, you should. Think about it. There wouldn’t be any World Backup Day if backing up weren’t so important in the first place.

Another example is the National Download Day. While it’s not exactly a world day, it’s still a day that’s celebrating the importance of downloading. This particular day is celebrated every 28th of December. Interestingly, there’s a reason why it’s celebrated on that day. Apparently, it that’s time of the year when most of the apps are downloaded.

Now, there’s such a thing as a Data Privacy Day. It’s celebrated every 28th of January. This is an international holiday that aims to increase the awareness of data privacy. What’s interesting about it is that it’s not new.

The non-profit National Cybersecurity Alliance marked the occasion, observed since 2007, with a gathering of corporate privacy policy wonks at LinkedIn’s San Francisco, California, headquarters. Kelvin Coleman, executive director of the NCA, presided over the gathering, which he characterized as an exploration of the opportunities and challenges for the privacy road ahead.

(Via: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/01/29/data_privacy_day_comes_and_goes/)

Other sources would say that the Data Privacy Day began in 2008. Whether it’s 2007 or 2008, the point is, who knew there was such a day? I didn’t. The ignorance on such topic could probably explain why there are still a lot of red flags in data privacy nowadays.

In the opening panel, Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center, framed the discussion with a reference to her organization’s 2018 data exposure report. The report found a 23 per cent decline in the number of data loss incidents and a 126 per cent increase in the amount of personally identifiable information exposed, amounting to almost 198 million records.

Data spills of this sort

Hard Drive Failures Don’t Have To Lead To Data Loss

You can’t escape a hard drive failure. However, you can survive it and move on from it. That is, if you know how to deal with it. The inevitability of hard drive failures is real. You’ll be facing one, two, three, or maybe more in your lifetime. Come out of a hard drive failure unscathed by averting data loss.

Here are some helpful tips to survive a hard drive failure that usually leads to data loss. The first of which is to back up your data.

The rule of thumb to follow when making data backups, says Michael Cobb, director of engineering at DriveSavers, a data-recovery firm in Novato, California, is ‘3-2-1’: “It’s three copies, [on] two different media, one off-site.”

(Via: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01040-w)

The second tip is to make use of an automatic backup system. In the event that your shared or hard drive fails, you can always get back your files from your online backup service provider.

When making backups, automation is key. Kelly Smith, a cardiac geneticist at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, has access to a shared network drive that is copied to tape. She used to move her files to the drive manually, but only monthly; in the event that the drive failed, newer files could be lost. An automated cloud-based backup system called Druva inSync, from data-protection firm Druva in Sunnyvale, California, now obviates that concern. “It’s one less thing I have to worry about,” she says.

(Via: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01040-w)

The third tip is to regularly check all your backups. If your data are backed up to the cloud, check if all your files are complete and updated. Reliable online backup services should be able to back up and update all your files automatically. As long as your computer is connected to the internet, the backup service should be able to do its work silently and efficiently. Still, you have to take some time to check your online backup account to see if all your files are backed up and updated.

Don’t